HUNDRED FOOT JOURNEY BOOK

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The Hundred-Foot Journey book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Helen Mirren. The Hundred-Foot Journey is a novel written by Richard C. Morais and published in July the free encyclopedia. Jump to navigation Jump to search. For the film based on the book, see The Hundred-Foot Journey (film). A lot of ground is covered in Richard C. Morais's first novel, “The Hundred-Foot Journey”: close to 25 million feet, by my count, from India to.


Hundred Foot Journey Book

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The Hundred-Foot Journey [Richard C. Morais] on raudone.info Slumdog Millionaire meets Ratatouille” (The New York Times Book Review) in this “ delicious. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. With his debut novel, longtime Forbes magazine Add Audible book to your download for just $ Deliver to your. The Hundred-Foot Journey is not just about cooking, but about the clash of It's not often a book can be described as sumptuous, but that's.

The place does well, but his actions cause tension between the upper and lower classes, and eventually the lower class riots, breaking into Papa's restaurant, destroying the place, and killing Hassan's mother.

One thing's for sure: They can't stay in Mumbai. Papa sells the property, the family moves to England to live with relatives, and he tries to start a new business—but fails. The straw that breaks the camel's back is that they find Hassan making out with his cousin. The family has a fall-out and Papa packs them up to travel across Europe, sampling food and searching for a new home.

On it, they open the Maison Mumbai, which is the first Indian restaurant in the area.

There's instant trouble afoot in paradise. They immediately encounter the neurotic, competitive and high-and-mighty Madame Gertrude Mallory, who owns the inn across the street. Why does she care? She's disgusted with this invasion from the East that disrupts her elegant vibe across the street. Not to mention the competition. Papa and Mallory sabotage each other many times until one fateful tussle results in Hassan being pushed into a stove by accident.

You may opt-out at any time. You agree to receive occasional updates and special offers for The New York Times's products and services. Thank you for subscribing. An error has occurred. Please try again later. You are already subscribed to this email. Morais pp. News World U.

Politics N. Events Guide Television Theater Video: I actually think it will make a much better movie, which is apparently what the author wanted all along see Acknowledgements.

View 2 comments. Lovely novel written by the novelist and journalist Richard C. Morais delicious read concerning food and spices a novel about passion and persistence which lead us to what we really love and appreciate in life Hassan the indian narrator and his family from Mumbai to Paris ,and the hundred foot Journey that he had to take between the Indian kitchen and a traditional French one, to become a well known chef with distinctive talant a journey between different cultures, traditions and cooking.

This book was such a delight to read, or rather listen to! If you're looking for a feel good book that makes you laugh and your tummy rumble, then this might be the book for you. I am by no means a gourmand, but I love reading about food adventures, and especially about how food unites peoples and cultures.

The strange events that lead Hassan Haji from his family owned restaurant on the Mumbai coast to the French Alps is the backdrop of this quaint novel. Tutored at a young age in the art of coo This book was such a delight to read, or rather listen to! Tutored at a young age in the art of cooking by his grandmother, Hassan inherits an artist's eye for flavoring and exotic food combinations. Moreover, the marriage of two completely different cultures put me in mind of how well done The Elegance of the Hedgehog was, and also why the French are so stinking cool!

I cannot wait to watch this film.

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I am a die hard Helen Mirren fan! Read as part of the ABN Summer Reading Challenge recommended by Joyce I remember sitting down to watch the film adaptation of this some time ago and getting distracted rather quickly and never completing the film Perhaps that should have been an omen.

This book started off so well with its intoxicating descriptions of food and smells But then it quickly grew tiresome and dissolved into a poorly plotted book about an Indian man who becomes a Parisian restaurateur and Michelin starred chef.

C Read as part of the ABN Summer Reading Challenge recommended by Joyce I remember sitting down to watch the film adaptation of this some time ago and getting distracted rather quickly and never completing the film Characters lacked any memorably defining personalities instead feeling rather flat and contrived.

The plot Well there really was none. It was just a succession of memories and events that felt more like a stilted memoir. Sadly this wasn't for me. But it didn't. And any good feeling I had about the book to that point disappeared in the mundanities of restaurant life. Jul 25, Connie G rated it really liked it Shelves: After his family's restaurant was destroyed in Mumbai, his father took the family to Europe to distance himself from the tragedy. A few years later, their car breaks down in the French village of Lumiere, a beautiful setting near the Alps, and they decide to stay.

Hassan's bearlike, boisterous father opens a casual Indian restaurant across the street from the award-winning Le Saule Pl 3.

Hassan's bearlike, boisterous father opens a casual Indian restaurant across the street from the award-winning Le Saule Pleureur, owned by Madame Mallory. The two colorful restaurant owners wage war until an accident lands Hassan in the hospital. Madame Mallory regrets her attitude, and takes Hassan on as an apprentice in her elegant French restaurant. Hassan crosses the road in a "hundred-foot journey" from Indian to fine French cuisine.

This is the beginning of an exciting career for Hassan who was born with an exceptional culinary gift. The story was infused with the smells and sights of both the Indian and French kitchens. Temperamental chefs are a source of humor in the story. Food critics and the Michelin star system add immense pressure to the job of a chef.

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Although I would love to fly to Paris for a restaurant tour, I think I will have to settle for seeing the movie based on this charming book. View all 8 comments. Jul 27, Mary rated it did not like it. Her participation in the film haven't seen it made me think this would be something I'd want to read. I wasn't a huge fan of this book.

The Hundred-Foot Journey

After the main character goes to Paris, I found myself thinking, why am I still here? While Margaret's appearance near the book's end suggests they might pick things back up, their involvement is an afterthought.

The third star comes about as a half-assed surprise, but felt more like a success for ol Gertie than it did for Hassan. I felt way too much importance was placed on the death of Paul, a character we hardly know, while so little was placed on Hassan's father's death.

Ironically, all the fancy pants food references, to me, came off as snobby, which is something we learn at the end Gertie was trying to steer him away from by keeping an open mind.

I liked the rivalry early on, the lively characters of his family, the psuedo-romance, the Madame's transformation, but just about everything after the move to Paris was boring as hell. Aug 09, Sara rated it it was ok. What a disappointment! The book seemed like it would have so much promise. So much life and vigor and interest!

Not the case. The book starts off in India and is depressing and sad. I can understand and respect that.

What I did not care for was the graphic comparison of squid to a penis, the image of a girl defecating on the road side and "fingering" her excrement, etc. When the family moves to London, the crass tone of the novel gets worse with intimate descriptions of foreplay and arousal and What a disappointment! When the family moves to London, the crass tone of the novel gets worse with intimate descriptions of foreplay and arousal and lewd behavior as well as heavy drug use.

A demented family member who should be respected in her old age is "managed" as she behaves inappropriately and then soils herself. I was hoping that the book would improve when they moved to France. And it does. But it does not abandon the foul descriptions and language.

This may be a book about food and blending of cultures but it is modern, crass, depressing and poorly written. The shock value wears thin and demonstrates that the author really does not know how to write.

I typically avoid recommendations from Oprah and should have kept to my rule. I stopped just before half way through and could care less if the second half is the most brilliant story ever because the first half is a waste of paper. View all 7 comments. Mar 23, Kiran Afzal rated it it was ok. I had heard a lot about this book, and considering its about food and focuses on an Indian boy's journey into French cuisine, I thought it would be interesting.

Unfortunately, I couldn't relate to it at all. The initial few chapters started off nicely, but after that the author just jumped from one point to another abruptly. Even though the title character was Indian belonging to a Muslim family, there was nothing that I felt I could relate - neither in terms of culture or food or traditions.

Had I had heard a lot about this book, and considering its about food and focuses on an Indian boy's journey into French cuisine, I thought it would be interesting. Had this been a book on French cuisine, I probably might have different expectations but right now I am just trying to understand the point of the novel.

At the same time, I do think that the movie adaption of this novel has potential. Jul 23, Robyn rated it it was ok. This thing happened. And then this next thing happened. And then, and then! A thing happened. Another thing happened.

Things things things. I had to constantly remind myself that this was a work of fiction and not an autobiography written by someone who doesn't know how to write. A lot of tedious descriptions and little character development.

I bet the movie will actually be better than the novel. I really wanted to love this book but I just couldn't pull it off.

For the first third, I was hooked but somewhere around the middle I just stopped caring about the characters - fatal! There are some wonderful descriptive passages early in the story as the reader is introduced to chaotic Mumbai and its residents, the drab way-station of London and the calm respite of the French Jura. I built a clear picture in my mind of the narrator's father and of Madame Mallory, the quintessential French chef I really wanted to love this book but I just couldn't pull it off.

The narrator and intended main character Hassan remains underdeveloped and that is where this book doesn't succeed for me. I have no sense of what he sounds or looks like, his narrative voice is almost monotone and I still don't know what motivates him. Strangely, I have a feeling that Helen Mirren will make this story a much better movie than it was a book - and we all know that readers rarely say that.

View 1 comment. May 26, Stephanie Gillett rated it it was ok. This book fell way short of my expectations. It started out a nice character story though it did not grasp Indian life as I'd hoped , and it ended up a documentary of the Paris food community. The character of Mme Mallory seemed to be well thought through at the start, and then just dumped.

Same with the father and the whole Indian family. This book could have been any number of great things but somehow chose not to be anything great at all when it was done.

Major disappointment. Jun 26, Diane Barnes rated it it was amazing. This book was an absolute feast, no pun intended. Yes, I'm a foodie, and yes, I love wonderful books with great characters and story line. Put those two things together with charming dialogue, warmth, humor, lives well lived and lessons well learned, and you have this book. I added a star to this review simply because it was such a joy to read, from start to finish. View all 3 comments. Aug 17, Denise rated it liked it.

A tragic incident prompts his family to flee to France were Hassan shows an unexpected talent and taste for haute cuisine. The novel follows his ensuing career as a chef and the fate of his family in France.

The first part of the book centers on Hassan's family, his history and the importance of food in his life. The writing is lush, very descriptive of the tastes, s The Hundred-Foot Journey is the story of Hassan Haji, a young Indian boy who grows up above his grandfather's restaurant in Mumbai. The writing is lush, very descriptive of the tastes, smells, and sights.

The characters are interesting and the plot is fast-paced. However, after Hassan becomes a chef the thread of the story changes. The second half of the book is mostly about the politics of the restaurant world in France. The star system of ranking, the changes in haute cuisine, and the hierarchy among chefs. I didn't like this part nearly as well and I felt like Hassan's progress was stagnant. He seems to stop developing much as a person after a certain point.

The Hundred-Foot Journey

Still, a pleasant, easy read and not bad at all for a first novel. I'll be interested to see what Richard Morais writes next. Morais's first novel follows a familiar, even Seussian, formula, but it paints the sights, smells, and tastes of its protagonist's adventure so vividly that I needed to stop for a snack. Its prose addresses the upper crust society of Paris without falling prey to pretension, though as a foodie, I might have had a bit of an advantage in comprehension.

The characters are easy to love, and that attachment left me deeply moved by the final pages.

It's a quick read; you have no excuse! Mar 14, Renita D'Silva rated it it was amazing. A fabulous book! A feast for all the senses! Loved it SO much. Curry practically wafts from the pages as this sensory exploration carries you though Hassan's childhood in Mumbai India.

Feel the heat, hear the hum of mosquito wings, see the vibrantly colored saris worn by his mother.This book was an absolute feast, no pun intended. The Hundred-Foot Journey-August. The village has never seen anything like the noisy extended family with their exotic Indian cuisine.

Mar 14, Renita D'Silva rated it it was amazing. Madam Mallory recognizes Hassan's gift for blending favors and cooking, though it is crude and undeveloped, but she takes him under her wing and teaches him all she can.

I'll be interested to see what Richard Morais writes next. View all 3 comments. Without completely giving the ending away, I will say that while Hassan has his ups and downs during his coming of age period and while establishing his career, it finishes on a very high note. Hassan is overwhelmed by how Catholic his room in Madame Mallory's house feels. Adil Tansykbayev Only thing I could think of after reading this book was food.

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