JOYCE CAROL OATES BLONDE EBOOK

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Joyce Carol Oates Blonde Ebook

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In this ambitious book, Joyce Carol Oates boldly reimagines the inner, poetic, and child, the woman, the fated celebrity and idolized blonde the world came to know as Marilyn Monroe. Blonde. A Novel. by Joyce Carol Oates. ebook. In this ambitious book, Joyce Carol Oates boldly reimagines the inner, poetic, and spiritual life of Norma Jeane Baker—the child, the woman. download the eBook Blonde, A Novel by Joyce Carol Oates online from Australia's leading online eBook store. Download eBooks from Booktopia today.

Nor the ecstasy of madness of ambition to revenge herself upon the world by conquering it, somehow, anyhow--however any "world" is "conquered" by any mere individual, and that individual female, parentless, isolated, and seemingly of as much intrinsic worth as a solitary insect amid a teeming mass of insects. Yet I will make you all love me and I will punish myself to spite your love was not then Norma Jeane's threat, for she knew herself, despite the wound in her soul, lucky to have been brought to this place and not scalded to death or burned alive by her raging mother in the bungalow at Highland Avenue.

Norma Jeane's charisma attracts couples looking to adopt, but Gladys refuses to sign papers giving up custody. As a teenager, Norma Jeane is hard working and obedient, but painfully shy, an adequate student who fails to be chosen for cheerleading or theater arts. Genetic blessings and a gift for ethereal innocence wielded without effort attract the attention of men, including her Uncle Warren.

Initially repelled by the prospect of marriage, Norma Jeane bends to Elsie's schemes and weds a good-looking boy from a respectable family named Bucky Glazer. She is sixteen years old. As a wife, Norma Jeane seeks perfection and nothing less, working hard to make sure that all of her husband's needs are met. Initially grateful to have been matched to a wife with movie stars looks, Bucky is nothing but a boy himself, and ultimately bristles at his bride's neediness and creeping insecurity that he too might one day leave her.

In , he does just that, enlisting in the Merchant Marines. On the assembly line, she ultimately catches the eye of photographer Otto Ose as he searches for good-looking faces for a piece in Stars and Stripes on girls of the home front. As a model, Norma Jeane has her revenge on those who've rejected her, but has her eyes set on being taken seriously as an actress.

She lands an agent, a cunning hunchback named I. Shinn who not only envisions big things for Norma Jeane, but is in love with her. Signed to a six-month contract with The Studio after she submits to the sexual gratifications of starmaking executive Mr.

With his client at rock bottom, Shinn calls in favors and gets Monroe an audition for a bit part in a movie titled The Asphalt Jungle. The director stares astonished at this platinum blonde lying on the floor at his feet Explaining the character to me! She'd become as unself-conscious as a young willful child.

An aggressive child. He forgets to light the Cuban cigar he's unwrapped and stuck between his teeth. There's absolute silence in the rehearsal room as "Marilyn Monroe" begins the scene by shutting her eyes, lying motionless in a mimicry of sleep, her breathing deep and slow and rhythmic and her rib cage and breasts rising, falling, rising, falling , her smooth arms and her legs in nylons outstretched in the abandonment of sleep deep as hypnosis.

What are the thoughts men think, gazing down upon the body of a beautiful sleeping girl? Eyes shut, lips just slightly parted. The opening of the scene lasts no more than a few seconds but it seems much longer.

And the director is thinking, This girl is the first actress of the twenty or more he's auditioned for the role including the black haired actress he's probably going to cast who has caught on to the significance of the scene's opening, the first who seems to have given the role any intelligent thought and who has actually read the entire script or so she claims and formed some sort of judgment on it.

The girl opens her eyes, sits up slowly and blinking, wide-eyed, and says in a whisper, "Oh, I--must have been asleep. Everyone's uncomfortable. There is something strange here. There were scenes in Blonde so vivid I saw them play out as a long-form television in my mind. Both the tragic glamour of the Marilyn Monroe story and Oates' insightful and electric prose are powerfully compelling.

The rooting interest for Norma Jeane to survive the abuses leveled on her by those in power and to take control of her life is strong, even though we know how she ultimately loses her life.

Oates justifies her massive page length by exploring how relationships or experiences became the keys Norma Jeane used to unlock her most memorable performances on set.

Norma Jeane's approach to her craft is responsible for the enigma of Marilyn Monroe. Widmark was taken by surprise. Never would he know who was "Marilyn," who was "Nell. He was a skilled technical actor. He followed a director's direction. Often his mind was elsewhere.

There was something humiliating about being an actor, if you were a man. Any actor is a kind of female. The makeup, the wardrobe fittings. The emphasis on looks, attractiveness.

Who the hell cares what a man looks like? What kind of man wears eye makeup, lipstick, rouge? But he'd expected to walk away with the movie. A crappy melodrama that might've been a stage play it was so talky and static, mostly a single set. Swagger through Don't Bother To Knock as the love interest of two good-looking young women who never meet The other was Anne Bancroft, in her Hollywood debut.

But every fucking scene with "Nell" was a grapple. He'd swear that girl wasn't acting. She was so deep into her movie character you couldn't communicate with her; it was like trying to speak with a sleepwalker. Eyes wide open and seemingly seeing, but she's seeing a dream. Of course, the babysitter Nell was a kind of sleepwalker; the script defined her that way. Oates demonstrates remarkable agility balancing plates in Blonde.

There's Norma Jeane's need for respect as an artist and how this contradicts her need to be cared for. There are the men: Though mingling of fact and fiction, we're shown how an often sick industry can damage and destroy unstable people, and whether immortality on film is worth that sacrifice.

View all 39 comments. Apr 22, Jaline rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book was very difficult to read. Not because of the writing, which is phenomenal, but because we already know the sad ending. Joyce Carol Oates takes us on a literary journey from babyhood through to the end with a flawless, relentless depiction of the mind within the body that embarked on this particular journey.

It is beyond sad to bear witness to the reactions and defenses of a mind molded by fear, uncertainty, unpredictability and unreliability that resulted in a young woman who became This book was very difficult to read. It is beyond sad to bear witness to the reactions and defenses of a mind molded by fear, uncertainty, unpredictability and unreliability that resulted in a young woman who became her own worst enemy and basically orchestrated her own downfall.

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With her background, falling prey to the Hollywood system of male dominance of the time seemed inevitable. A downward-directed spiral, indeed. Lamentable as the story is, I would recommend this book to any reader who is interested in the psychology of mind that can propel a soul through life from innocence to a tragic end. This book was marvellous in many ways!

It's a fictional piece of work following the life of Norma Jeane Baker, aka. Marilyn Monroe, from she's a child till her death as a year-old woman devoured and intoxicated with drugs, medication and alcohol. It's a tragic life story, but it's hugely inspiring as well, and if you have even the faintest interest in Marilyn Monroe's life I would highly recommend this book.

To me, one of the most interesting aspects of "Blonde" was how it balances fiction an This book was marvellous in many ways! To me, one of the most interesting aspects of "Blonde" was how it balances fiction and facts.

(ebook) Blonde

It's based on the truth, but it's retold through another person who, I assume, hasn't ever met Monroe and only know her through the media coverage that we all have access to. This book reads like great fiction, but simultaneously I learned so much about Monroe's fascinating life and development into the sexy icon she became. I have never read anything like this, and I know that this book has impacted me hugely. I will remember and cherish it for a long time to come because it speaks of a life so beloved, intriguing, tragic and yet fascinating, and it does so wonderfully.

What a piece of art "Blonde" is! View all 3 comments. Warts and all, it is a powerful book written by a powerful writer. There are the action, the people and the place; all of which are interrelated but in their totality incommunicable in isolation from the moral continuum of human affairs.

Even tossed about by the vagaries of her early years, the reader sees how Norma Jeane was destined for some kind of greatness. It was only later, after the little fighter had grown into a vibrant woman who had been knocked down one too many times that the inherited depression finally consumed her and dragged her into hell. So far, so good, despite its all-consuming sadness.

She reveals to us her secret loathing for Marilyn, sub-consciously played out in the voice of the men who hated The Blonde Actress: OK, we hear you. This is nothing but a vile peep show, it occurred to me half way through the novel. Here I am, engaging in the tearing down of the movie-queen, complicit in the act of rape.

No one is forcing me to read this book, just like no one forced Oates to write it. The voyeuristic quality is enhanced by the protracted use of the third person: We, the readers, are standing in the red light district, leering into the dimly-lit and dirty window where the young woman lies exposed and vulnerable. No one looks away, either out of decency or revulsion.

A human being is being torn apart, and we continue to be complicit in her excoriation. Knowing this -- knowing how much Norma Jeane abhorred being written about in her Marilyn persona -- Oates revels in ignoring her plea. Like the paparazzi who swoop like carrion birds, she licks up every last intimate detail and splatters it luridly for our consumption.

Over and over again, we hear stupid cunt , hailed as the avenue to the stinking, infertile receptacle. As much as art can be an exploratory medium to expose the vileness of the world and act as a cathartic force for change, just as often it reveals the vileness or the victim within. It often uncovers our own hidden truths and reveals to us our own failings. Certain secrets should not be violated. Add to that, there are some books that should never have been written, despite the truths they hold.

This is one of them. View all 28 comments. Jan 27, Madeline rated it liked it Shelves: I wasn't really sure how to go about reviewing this book at first, but then I came up with a solution, and it's a reviewing style I'll call The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

Here we go. The Good: Of course, Joyce Carol Oates is a scary-talented author and I bow at her feet. The writing in this book goes from staggeringly beautiful to heart-wrenchingly sad, and all of it is masterfully executed.

The fact is, no matter what the following might say, I would probably give my left foot to be able to wri I wasn't really sure how to go about reviewing this book at first, but then I came up with a solution, and it's a reviewing style I'll call The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. The fact is, no matter what the following might say, I would probably give my left foot to be able to write like Oates does.

So let's move on. The Bad: Okay Joyce, I get that Marilyn had issues. I get that men pushed her around. But honestly: There's a secret way into the Walled Garden! There's a hidden door in the wall, but you must wait like a good little girl for this door to be opened You must win over the doorkeeper - an old, ugly, green-skinned gnome. You must make the doorkeeper take notice of you. You must make the doorkeeper desire you.

And then he will love you and will do your bidding! Smile, and be happy! Smile, and take off your clothes! For your Magic Friend in the mirror will help you So long as you remain with your Prince in the Walled Garden. And I haven't even mentioned how she calls each of her husbands "Daddy".

Really, Joyce: The Ugly: These are two of my favorite movies - or I should say, they used to be. I'm not sure, because I haven't tried watching them, but they might be ruined for me. Can we talk about Some Like It Hot for a minute here? Oates's book tries to make the case that by this point in Marilyn Monroe's career everyone was disgusted with her, and her love interest in the movie, "C" aka Tony Curtis was so grossed out by her that he hating acting in the romantic scenes with her.

Tony Curtis's autobiography, American Prince: A Memoir , recently came out, and I read an excerpt in Vanity Fair. He was writing about Marilyn and how they used to date before she was famous and had red hair two things that aren't in the book - HA! Joyce Carol Oates, I know something you don't know!

Anyway, they weren't going out when they made the movie, but he was still attracted to her. According to Curtis, he totally had a hard-on for that entire scene in the yacht, and Marilyn knew it. What's Oates's take on the movie? Here you go: And I hope he sends Joyce Carol Oates a letter that goes like this: Oates - Rot in hell, you pretentious feminazi asshole. What gives you the right to write down Marilyn's life for her and assign roles to each of us so we could all look like evil bastards compared to her?

You didn't know her, you didn't know any of us, and you're no better than all the tabloids, exploiting her fame and her death to make money. Fuck you very much, Madeline Tony Curtis.

View all 12 comments. Joyce Carol Oates has appropriated our American wet dream, the winner of the global boner bracket, the all-time "Who'd You Rather? No soft-focus angel Christ here, either: Oates insists on the fact of her body: Marilyn Monroe spends the entire book menstruating and sweating and stinking and pissing.

When she's sodomized by an old guy Oates describes it, "like a beak plunging in. She feels everything. Like Christ, she has some Daddy issues. Like Christ, she tries to chicken out. Like Christ she seems to understand where this is all headed, and to face it bewildered and terrified.

She's not dumb, she just has no defenses. She knows why she's here. Wasn't Marilyn Monroe already created? She has her own agenda.

Oates has her sights set high. Blonde is her longest book and her most audacious in a long career of audacity, and it totally works. Suck it, Mailer.

The singular Great American Novel doesn't exist, because there are so many Americans, right? The loner cowboy; the runaway slave; the pioneer woman - and the dizzy blonde, too, the sexpot, the whore, that's an American archetype. For all of Blonde's claims as a novelized, feminist retelling of Marilyn Monroe's life, I have seldom come across a book with more disturbing, dehumanizing references to the female body and mind.

Even though I reminded myself on every page that this book is a feminist interpretation of Marilyn's part of the Hollywood mythos, I found it hard to stomach. Perhaps I am missing the point, but so be it. Blonde is the Fictionalized Biography of Marilyn Monroe.

I chose to read it over a more conventional style biography because I thought it would thought would be a more personal account and show more of her character and personality. The book chronicles her life as a young child growing up with a mentally unstable mother and eventual placement in an orphanage and foster homes.

Beneath the makeup and behind the smile I am just a girl who wishes for the world. Some people have been unkind. If I say I want to grow as an actress, they look at my figure.

If I say I want to develop, to learn my craft, they laugh. Somehow they don't expect me to be serious about my work. But they say that if Marilyn Monroe had actually slept with every man who claimed she had.

She would have never have had any time to make movies! I'm selfish, impatient and a little insecure. I make mistakes, I am out of control and at times hard to handle.

But if you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best. Marilyn was however married three times and seemed to idolise the idea of being a wife and mother but all her marriges were doomed to fail.

I have too many fantasies to be a housewife I guess I am a fantasy. It's better to be unhappy alone than unhappy with someone. Throughout the book Marilyn is portrayed as a fragile and unstable person. And as the book goes on her behaviour becomes more and more manic and depressive. Happiness is the most important thing in the world, without it, you live a life of depression.

Marilyn is depicted as a fragile girl used by men, Hollywood and the public. A misunderstood and naive woman who was adored but never truly loved and sadly died alone. I enjoyed this book but never really felt like I got "under Marilyn's skin. It's been many years since I read this one but it really struck me as getting to the heart of Marilyn Monroe better than nonfiction.

Or rather Norma Jean, as Marilyn is not the star of this novel.

Samenvatting

The novel reads like a sweeping biography. Of course, her life and death as well as her goddess-like fame is covered, but it's Norma Jean the reader gets to know. She's the only person worth knowing because Marilyn is a mirage. A mirage that still holds our interest almost sixty years after her death. Oates isn't someone I would have thought would take on this subject. But I'm so glad she did. The novel is intimate and interior in a way that makes all the attention Norma Jean's creation got pale in comparison.

We sometimes forget with historical characters, even eye candy like Marilyn, that there is always more than meets the eye. They were real flesh and blood human beings with likes and dislikes, hopes and fears, betrayals and insecurities, opinions and sometimes even a wicked sense of humor. They are never the cartoon or cardboard cutouts we oftentimes have in mind or on a loop.

I'll admit it was challenging to go into this novel with all the baggage in my head of her tragic death, her rocky marriages, and her dalliance with a U. Add to that her stunning beauty, staggering fame, and indelible status as an icon and it would seem almost impossible to get into a fictional account of her life when there are so many real life questions still haunting her ethereal image. But Oates isn't just any writer. She knows the fairytale you have in your head about the girl born under one name that died under another.

And that's the hook.

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Because as much as any one of us thinks we may know about Marilyn, we know even less about Norma Jean. And she's the one to get to know. She's the VIP, not Marilyn. One wonders why the image of Marilyn has never faded. It's like the Energizer Bunny of imagery - it just keeps going and going and going. One could guess it has something to do with her beauty. Sure, that's part of it. But really, there were plenty of beautiful women that she shared the silver screen with.

Women that were as famous and desired as Marilyn in her time. Women that aren't still household names like Marilyn is. Part of it is her tragic end. She died young and left a good looking corpse and all that, but more than that she was vulnerable in a way that few are brave enough to even attempt.

She's like the spirit animal for vulnerability and empathy. The door to her heart and soul were left more than just a little ajar. That's what still gets to us I think. And that was all Norma Jean peeking out from behind the sex goddess. While we were busy gawking at the caricature she created for us, she was busy seeing us, really seeing us. I think that's the secret sauce of Marilyn. The strength of Oates novel is her foray into Norma Jean's childhood. It really is the heartbeat or lifeblood that feeds into everything else.

The entire novel is engrossing even though you know how it all works out. I think because Oates threads the why of it into her prose and not in a heavy-handed way. Oates doesn't candy coat the tragedy. And by tragedy I don't mean the tragedy of her death or the prison of her fame, but rather the tragedy of a woman that maybe never felt truly loved.

She was painfully aware of how people treated her because of how she looked, more so than based on who she was. I think she was conflicted. On the one hand her looks were the least interesting thing about her, but on the other she didn't want to let the world into her interior life, where Norma Jean resided. One wonders which one in the end was ready to go. One might even wonder which one may have killed the other if that's what went down.

I highly recommend this book that tackles a myriad of issues but none more than what it is to be a soul lost at sea trying your best to steer your own ship through waters infested with mermaid-sharks and pirate-vultures - and you the only thing on their menu. View 2 comments. I had no idea what this book was about when I checked it out from the library. It wasn't until I got it home that I noticed the cover was a silhouette of Marilyn Monroe with her back to the camera.

This book kept me up til the wee hours for the seven days it took me to finish it. It is a fictionalized biography in that it recalls the life of Marilyn from birth to "mysterious" death at age 37? I learned so much about her childhood she never knew her father; her mother was institutionalized; she spent years in orphanages and foster homes; married by age 16 as well as about how she was discovered, and how she made it in Hollywood.

The book is a portrait of a victim exploited by producers she would make millions for the studios and they would pay her minimum wages After reading this, I rushed out and rented Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and How to Marry a Millionaire just to see for myself how the camera loved Marilyn.

View all 4 comments. Sep 28, S Suzanne rated it it was amazing Shelves: I think this may be JCO's masterwork. I would recommend to anyone with an appetite for long and literary books. It is typically darker than perhaps reality, given JCO's penchant for the dark side of things.

So take that as a warning, Marilyn fans: Pages have come forward that they were made to service him, I think this may be JCO's masterwork. Pages have come forward that they were made to service him, and there are accounts that he cheated on Jackie on thier honeymoon - so much for Camelot.

Sounds like he was a nightmare not to be believed toward women. Agree with others that this shines a light on troubles of women for a generation and beyond I feel like JCO tapped into a lot of uncanny truth here, though. She is one of the most amazing living authors in my opinion.

A huge book as JCO gives us a fictional re-imagining of Norma Jeane sic from her early childhood with a dangerous, mentally-unstable mother, via an orphanage, a foster home and, eventually, Hollywood - via numerous detours. JCO is especially interested in Norma Jeane's inner life and her relationships with men, all driven by her search for her absent father. I know little about Monroe so have no idea what is fact and what fiction but certainly this feels like a convincing portrait of a woman c A huge book as JCO gives us a fictional re-imagining of Norma Jeane sic from her early childhood with a dangerous, mentally-unstable mother, via an orphanage, a foster home and, eventually, Hollywood - via numerous detours.

I know little about Monroe so have no idea what is fact and what fiction but certainly this feels like a convincing portrait of a woman created and constructed as 'Marilyn Monroe'. Certainly the persona made millions for the studios while Norma Jeane was paid a pittance but it also served Norma Jeane herself, allowing her, to some extent, to keep her true self hidden - although, eventually, of course, it becomes erased JCO makes much of 'Marilyn's' body: The idea of Gemini, The Twins, appears and reappears, too, from Norma Jeane's Mirror Self, to the literal number of characters born under the star sign.

Inflected by concerns with feminism, with gaze theory, this is an uncompromisingly modern take on a sad, sad story. There are points where this made me think about Sylvia Plath, another American young woman caught up in the social constrictions of what a woman is supposed to be.

It would have been easy for JCO to merely give us a sad, almost pathetic tale of exploitation, loneliness and abuse, but actually she does something far cleverer and more discomforting that that: An intelligent analysis of a modern cultural icon, and a book which gives back attention to the woman behind the Monroe mask.

It appears to have pissed off many Monroe as well as Oates fans. Many who claim writer Oates was just bitter and jealous of Monroe's beauty, one reviewer going so far, after seeing Oates picture on the back cover, to say it was because "she'd been beaten with the ugly stick herself". Sheesh, talk about ugly people! I enjoyed the book even though it was pretty bleak and mostly depressing but how could it be otherwise? Monroe's life wasn't exactly the happily ever fantasy what with her rough beginning, the abuse, the sex and the drugs.

I thought Oates did an enviable job of recreating Monroe's voice, her motivation and getting to the heart of the woman behind the myth. It begins with Monroe as a young child and portrays the abuse she suffers at the hands of an unstable mother and sets the ground work for Marilyn's unsuccessful search for a normal life which clashes time and time again with her overwhelming drive to become a successful and important actress.

Read this, read this, read this! Fantastic writing. I learned so much more about her life and her relationships. There were some interesting twists on what I knew to be her life, like her relationship to Cass Chaplin and Eddy G.

Robinson Jr JCO's writing was beautiful. This one slipped under my radar for a long time, but thanks to Goodreads Fabian in particular , this was brought to my attention and so glad it was.

Fictional account of Marilyn Monroe. It makes me want to know more about her life. I re-read this in May, for my book group, more than 10 years after reading it the first time. Some of the women in my book group are not crazy about Oates. I am again stunned by O Fictional account of Marilyn Monroe. I am again stunned by Oates' writing and research. Though this is written as fiction, I am pretty sure Marilyn Monroe spent time in foster homes, did not know her father, was married to "an ex-athelete" and "A playwright" as Oates calls DiMaggio and Miller.

The whole scene with President Kennedy was depressing as hell, and I really hope it did not go down that way. Yes, the "go down" part was intentional.

Truly a candle in the wind, as Sir Elton wrote of her later.

Provocativa y descarnada es como se puede describir esta novela, en donde Joyce Carol Oates se inspira en la vida de Marilyn Monroe para hablarnos de lo cruel de la fama, de lo corrupto del mundo de Hollywood y de la doble moral en la que vive la sociedad estadounidense. Gran novela de una gran escritora. Jul 29, Catherine rated it liked it. Blonde provides a masterful, disturbing and perceptive characterization of Marilyn Monroe that coincides with all of the other information I have read about her but provides additional interpretation into her psyche through the guise of fiction.

The book itself is impossible to describe as it takes on a stylistic form that is very specific and complex. This is not just someone randomly writing a fictional biography of Monroe. This is Joyce Carol Oates, one of the most prolific and important auth Blonde provides a masterful, disturbing and perceptive characterization of Marilyn Monroe that coincides with all of the other information I have read about her but provides additional interpretation into her psyche through the guise of fiction.

This is Joyce Carol Oates, one of the most prolific and important authors of our time. She paints Monroe as someone who is basically doomed from the start as her early experiences shaped her character which together forms a self-destructive soul.

She just wants to be accepted and loved. She wants desperately to be considered a serious actress. She is looked at as a whore by all which is not helped with her sleeping with everyone. Nobody can look past her body and her beauty. She is far too trustworthy. She is far too easily influenced by others. Everybody uses her and she willfully lets herself be used.

She is plagued with an intense and lifelong debilitating stage-fright. Her childhood included an absent father which she turned into mythic proportions at a young age, a very troubled mother who possibly tried to killer her, sexual abuse at foster homes and being married off at a very young age to someone equally incapable of handling marriage are just some of her early experiences which shape her.

All of these events are true and Oates did not make any of this up. This is an assertion I have read confirmed by many who interacted with her. Oates graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in English as valedictorian in [12] and received her M.

She was a Ph. Vanguard published Oates' first book, the short-story collection By the North Gate , in It dramatizes his drift into protest against the world of education and the sober, established society of his parents, his depression, and eventually murder-cum-suicide. It was inspired by a real-life incident as were several of her works and Oates had been acquainted with the model of her protagonist.

She revisited this subject in the title story of her collection Last Days: Stories Henry Awards. All were finalists for the annual National Book Award. Oates's novel them won the National Book Award for Fiction. Again, some of the key characters and events were based on real people whom Oates had known or heard of during her years in the city.

Since then she has published an average of two books a year. Frequent topics in her work include rural poverty, sexual abuse, class tensions, desire for power, female childhood and adolescence, and occasionally the supernatural.

Violence is a constant in her work, even leading Oates to have written an essay in response to the question, "Why Is Your Writing So Violent? In the early s, Oates began writing stories in the Gothic and horror genres; in her foray into these genres, Oates said she was "deeply influenced" by Kafka and felt "a writerly kinship" with James Joyce. For more than 25 years, Oates has been rumored to be a "favorite" to win the Nobel Prize in Literature by oddsmakers and critics.

Oates has said that most of her early unpublished work was "cheerfully thrown away".John Harvey. Lovecraft Country. Melinda Camber Porter. Add to that her stunning beauty, staggering fame, and indelible status as an icon and it would seem almost impossible to get into a fictional account of her life when there are so many real life questions still haunting her ethereal image.

site Edition Verified download. Smile, and take off your clothes! Fran Kimmel. Pages have come forward that they were made to service him, and there are accounts that he cheated on Jackie on thier honeymoon - so much for Camelot.

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