THE HISTORY OF ISLAM BOOK

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An honest book about the history of Islam is going to be extremely negative because their history is filled with war and repression, which isn't unique in this world. Online shopping for History - Islam from a great selection at Books Store. Publisher's Note. We are presenting before you the third volume of the book History of Islam. This book was originally written in the Urdu language in (


The History Of Islam Book

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Here are several #ownvoices Islamic history books that we should all be reading. raudone.info - download History of Islam (3 Volumes) book online at best prices in India on raudone.info Read History of Islam (3 Volumes) book reviews & author details. Download Islamic books on Islamic History including History of Palestine, The Day of Wrath and The Islamic Openings.

These inspirations enjoined him to proclaim a strict monotheistic faith , to warn his compatriots of the impending Judgement Day , and to castigate social injustices of his city.

The final verse of the Quran Chapter 5, Verse 3 was revealed after Muhammad finished his sermon. After the sermon, Muhammad ordered the Muslims to pledge allegiance to Ali ; the future Sunni leaders Abu Bakr , Umar , and Uthman were among those who pledged allegiance to Ali at this event.

These leaders are known as the " Rashidun " or "rightly guided" Caliphs in Sunni Islam. They oversaw the initial phase of the Muslim conquests , advancing through Persia , Levant , Egypt , and North Africa. Although the office of caliph retained an aura of religious authority, it laid no claim to prophecy. To be close to the poor, he lived in a simple mud hut without doors and walked the streets every evening. After consulting with the poor, Umar established the Bayt al-mal , [38] [39] [40] a welfare institution for the Muslim and non-Muslim poor, needy, elderly, orphans, widows, and the disabled.

The Bayt al-mal ran for hundreds of years under the Rashidun Caliphate in the 7th century and continued through the Umayyad period and well into the Abbasid era.

Umar also introduced child benefit for the children and pensions for the elderly. The western parts of the Byzantine empire conquered by Arabs Local populations of Jews and indigenous Christians, who lived as religious minorities and were taxed while Muslims paid "Zakat" to finance the Byzantine—Sassanid Wars, often aided Muslims to take over their lands from the Byzantines and Persians, resulting in exceptionally speedy conquests.

Since the Constitution of Medina , drafted by the Islamic prophet Muhammad , the Jews and the Christians continued to use their own laws and had their own judges. As the Arabic language is written without vowels, speakers of different Arabic dialects and other languages recited the Quran with phonetic variations that could alter the meaning of the text.

When Uthman ibn Affan became aware of this, he ordered a standard copy of the Quran to be prepared.

Begun during his reign, the compilation of the Quran was finished some time between and , and copies were sent out to the different centers of the expanding Islamic empire. Each wanted the capital of the newly established Islamic State to be in their area.

When Uthman was assassinated in , Ali ibn Abi Talib , a cousin and son-in-law of Muhammad, assumed the position of caliph and moved the capital to Kufa in Iraq. Muawiyah I, the governor of Syria, and Marwan I demanded arrest of the culprits. Marwan I manipulated every one and created conflict, which resulted in the first civil war the "First Fitna".

Ali was assassinated by Kharijites in Six months later in , in the interest of peace, Ali's son Hasan , made a peace treaty with Muawiyah I. In the Hasan—Muawiya treaty , Hasan ibn Ali handed over power to Muawiya on the condition that he would be just to the people and not establish a dynasty after his death.

He was killed in the Battle of Karbala the same year, in an event still mourned by Shia on the Day of Ashura. In , Arab armies conquered Kabul , [67] and in pushed into the Maghreb. Although the Umayyad family came from the city of Mecca , Damascus was the capital. Muawiyah I moved his capital to Damascus from Medina , which led to profound changes in the empire.

In the same way, at a later date, the transfer of the Caliphate from Damascus to Baghdad marked the accession of a new family to power. As the state grew, the state expenses increased. Additionally the Bayt al-mal and the Welfare State expenses to assist the Muslim and the non-Muslim poor, needy, elderly, orphans, widows, and the disabled, increased, the Umayyads asked the new converts mawali to continue paying the poll tax.

The Umayyad rule, with its wealth and luxury also seemed at odds with the Islamic message preached by Muhammad. Read more Read less. Read more. Product details Paperback: Laurier Books Ltd; 1 edition October 1, Language: English ISBN Be the first to review this item site Best Sellers Rank: Tell the Publisher! I'd like to read this book on site Don't have a site? No customer reviews. Share your thoughts with other customers.

Write a customer review. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Learn more about site Prime. Get fast, free shipping with site Prime. Back to top. Get to Know Us. Should be titled "Islam: Some of what she says simply defies belief, such as her insistence that Muslim Fundamentalism is less prevalent and less threatening than the fundamentalism of virtually every other religion.

She writes with the clear objective of promoting interfaith dialogue by insi Should be titled "Islam: She writes with the clear objective of promoting interfaith dialogue by insisting on a picture of Islam that simply does not exist in the modern world. Her hypothetical Islam is peace-loving, tolerant, and egalitarian. Find me one Muslim country actually characterized by these things and yes, we can talk. Sep 20, Jonfaith rated it liked it Shelves: Another samizdat read.

The brevity proved itself frustrating as Ms. Armstrong cleaved succint defintions and proceeded while distinctions and details spasmed mutely in the wake. I suppose I remain resentful as she is an ecumenical apologist. People turn to her for the best word, not the most informed nor incisive.

She obliges with humility. I suppose that quality should be crucial to religion.

Jun 21, Terence rated it liked it Shelves: When I watch our pundits pontificate on affairs in the Middle East, I usually wind up pounding my forehead on the table: Things can't possibly be as simple as all that, and this "short history" of Islam proves that. As usual, Armstrong packs a lot of information into a small package. This is a high altitude flight over 1, years of Islamic history so the reader shouldn't expect to become an expert in sufism for example but it drives home several points: Islam is a far more complex phenomeno When I watch our pundits pontificate on affairs in the Middle East, I usually wind up pounding my forehead on the table: Islam is a far more complex phenomenon than a bunch of savage fanatics waving their swords and swearing "death to the Great Satan.

Obvious with even a minimum of reflection but always a good corrective considering the "crap" the media bombards us with.

History of Islam

Just to mention one tradition that has a direct bearing on Western development: Faylasuf philosophy. Without the efforts of men like Avicenna and Averroes and other, less well known lights it's unlikely the West could have recovered as much of its Greek heritage as it has.

Not to mention those traditions that have no direct Western parallel such as Shariah and sufism. Until c. The richest, most advanced, most innovative civilizations of the world were either Islamic, Chinese or Indian. Islam today wrestles with the same problems that plagued the West in the transition from the agrarian paradigm that had ruled human destiny since 10, BC to the modern one.

Armstrong goes to great length to show that Islam is no more prone to violent extremism than any other creed, religious our secular. In fact, Islam's emphasis on creating a just society here on Earth was several centuries ahead of the West's concerns about social welfare and human rights.

Unfortunately, knowing human history, it's the reactionaries and fundamentalists who write the agendas. The moderate voices on all sides are drowned by the fear-stricken shouts of the bigots just witness the hysteria over Iran.

As with Muhammad, the earlier bio I reviewed this week, this is a good introduction to a complex subject for any non-Muslim wanting to escape the simplistic BS that passes for analysis in the mainstream press. Mar 25, Kristin rated it liked it Shelves: This might better be subtitled "A Short Defense" rather than "A Short History", as Armstrong is mainly writing to address common Western prejudices against Islam and I would have appreciated her disclosing this, rather than disguising her book as a history.

The section on Muhammed is particularly painful in its overly apologetic tones, as Armstrong is obviously minimizing the less savory parts of history the massacre of the Jewish Qurayzah for example is explained away as a normal feature of This might better be subtitled "A Short Defense" rather than "A Short History", as Armstrong is mainly writing to address common Western prejudices against Islam and I would have appreciated her disclosing this, rather than disguising her book as a history.

The section on Muhammed is particularly painful in its overly apologetic tones, as Armstrong is obviously minimizing the less savory parts of history the massacre of the Jewish Qurayzah for example is explained away as a normal feature of a chronically violent society while she magnifies the parts about Muhammed bringing peace to Arabia.

She is also a little too overtly choosy over which parts of history she wants to paint as authentic divine revelation: On the flip side, a few pages later she describes how the leaders of a later rebellious revolt "claimed to be prophets, and produced Quranic-style 'revelations'". In the second instance, revelation gets put in ""'s, I guess so we know which part of history Armstrong's deity was really behind.

As long as I could keep Armstrong's biases in sight, I enjoyed learning about the history. I enjoyed her theory about fundamentalism being a reaction to modernity. But my interest has been piqued enough that I think I will pursue some more recent books on Islam.

Jul 27, Alison rated it liked it Shelves: The fourth book on the topic I've read in the last couple of months, it admirably filled in gaps, particularly in regards to the gradual development of Shii Islam, and the Iranian state, and the growth of Sunni Islam to become the majority interpretation. Armstrong's clear preference, however, is the role of Sufi mysticism, and this is covered with both depth and open admiration.

At times Armstrong's preference for spiritualistic ritual and practice annoyed a little, but it didn't detract from the overall clarity and detail in the book. Without the need to re-emphasise constantly that Islam is not inherently violent, Armstrong is able to just paint a brief picture of a complex, multifaceted, multi-shaded religion, which developed local and sectional variants across the globe.

She traces Islam's push-pull relationship with state power in a fascinating account, leaving her own conclusions tentative. Her strong assertion of the importance of modernity, and her thesis that Islamic worlds need longer to develop their own form of it, made a few too many unexamined assumptions for me to be entirely comfortable with it, and despite getting a lot of history out of the book, I'm not rushing to read her other work.

Apr 08, Ogo rated it did not like it. Mediocre writing and it is highlights some of the important historical events in Islam.

However, the author is either too rosy-eyed, afraid of being labeled an Islamophobe or literally afraid of ending up like Charlie Hebdo, Isioma Daniel or Theo Van Gogh to narrate the negative aspects of the history of Islam such as the religiously-justified slave trade, imperialism, colonialism, slavery and cultural genocide. The author is a biased apologist for Christianity and Islam; although it's good to h Mediocre writing and it is highlights some of the important historical events in Islam.

The author is a biased apologist for Christianity and Islam; although it's good to hear another view, she is simply too biased for her books to be read alone. Perhaps read her book alongside a more critical book so you can get both sides of the story. I had to give her such a low rating because she sites the long-debunked statistic that Islam is the fastest-growing religion and she makes no mention of the rise in atheism and apostasy in the Muslim world.

If she wrote an entire book citing such a wrong statistic then it's hard to take the rest of it seriously. Jul 01, Kamran rated it really liked it. Karen Armstrong carried out its responsibilities of being writer realistically. In early chapters, there are some enunciations coalesced with Maudodi's 'Khilafat o Malokiat' but sans myriads of miscellaneous. Initiated with chapter 1," Beginning", she delineated history of Islam beyond prejudices and biases like Lesley Hazleton.

There were reasonable grounds for banishing and slaughtering tribes in the Arab history with shaky and dubious characters which Lesley didn't bother to reveal in her books. In second chapter there is discussion about monarchies, less to absolute one, in Umayyads and Abbasids expansions and strategies they follow with every era's religious movements including esoteric movements and Fitnahs of the time with prominent leading personas.

During 9th century local tribes started to make a show under Abbasids rule and ruled on the behalf of tribes' name mainly. Seljuk, Ghaznavi were more successful till 10th centuries and then with these, others also took favourable positions while Abbasids disintegrated gradually.

CHAPTER TWO

The crusades is another topic of discussion in the book with all its to-day prevailed hatred which was used as a political instrument in Islamic world for a radically revolutionary propaganda and as well in West for their policies for Islamic areas.

There were he believed, three sorts of people: Conservatism was the fruit of agrarian culture. Liberalism flourished with industrial revolution. The writer clearly mentioned the hindrances created by the leasers itself what then they related with Islam, emphasising the double standard of leaders , time-to-time. In Safavid Iran, Shiism became the state religion; Falsafah and Sufism were dominant influences on Moghul policy; while the Ottoman Empire was run entirely on Shariah lines and was firmly grounded than other empires because it had been able to evolve so gradually.

Mulla Sadra" p: The Arrival of the West is the prime agnostic element. Armstrong related the ' unique ascendancy by an outgroup' with the the emergence of Arab Muslims as a major world power in the seventh and eighth centuries but the Muslims had not achieved world hegemony and had not developed a new kind of civilisation as Europe had began to do in the sixteenth century. There is a great deal of discuss on Islam and Nationality and Islam Democracy and then Fundamentalism. Wherever modernity takes root, a fundamentalist movement is likely to rise up alongside it in conscious reaction.

Linking it with Islam is wrong she emphasised time and again. Every religion faced fundamentalism as now is facing Islam as fundamentalism reveals a ' fissure in society' which is polarised between those who enjoy secular culture and those who regard it with dread. Violent distortion of the faith and more extreme form take place in stress and fear of culture and religious annihilation.

Apr 29, Kevin Bensema rated it it was ok.

The downfall of what could be an otherwise good history of Islam is Karen Armstrong's attempt to whitewash history.

She repeatedly distorts history and makes apology for Muslim violence throughout the centuries, while blaming Christianity no stranger to violence for introducing violence to Islam. But first, the good: With a few minor exceptions, the first two-thirds of the book is a good history of the spread of Islam, and a reasonably engaging read. Some other reviews have criticized the reada The downfall of what could be an otherwise good history of Islam is Karen Armstrong's attempt to whitewash history.

Some other reviews have criticized the readability of the post-Rashidun sections, but for a history text, it is excellent. Unfortunately, the book makes unfounded and unsourced assertions, and is rather clearly biased. Armstrong's liberal Christian heresies are interjected here and there, which is rather annoying.

The worst part, however, is the repeated assertion that Islamic fundamentalism is more characteristically fundamentalist than Islamic, and that p "equally prevalent and violent fundamentalisms of other faiths" are somehow the same. Sorry, but I can't remember the last time fundamentalist Buddhists got a whole state to themselves Iran, Saudi Arabia, etc.

Armstrong likes to quote the Fall of Jerusalem in A. Spain, Southern France, Sicily, and parts of Italy, which had been conquered or raided by Muslims centuries before, would like a word. She likes to talk about the slaughter at Jerusalem, but never mentions the slaughter at Constantinople.

The truth is, that when cities fall without a surrender agreement, there is no organized end to the fighting, and massive numbers of civilians die, whether the attacker is Christian or Turk. It gets funny at times. Aside from the mountain of evidence demonstrating at least the parity and probably the technological superiority of Medieval Europe over the Dar al-Islam, how could a tiny band of backward soldiers hold off the might of Islam, camped out in their 3rd holiest site, for nearly a century?

I'd give the book a pass. I'd suggest [Placeholder] instead. Mar 19, Simon Hollway rated it it was ok. A fine start when describing the emergence of Islam and the Prophet and the development of the religious movement.

Then it becomes rather choppy during the crusades chop chop before disintegrating during the final third which, sadly, was the part I had originally picked up the book for - the conception of the modern muslim state. Armstrong gets ensnared in a cacophony of names, names, names and dates and battles until it all becomes a blur and falls apart. She's strong on the generic broad str A fine start when describing the emergence of Islam and the Prophet and the development of the religious movement.

She's strong on the generic broad strokes at the beginning but gets bogged down in too much detail in too short a space and loses the thread later on - in biblical terms, a solid opener with the genesis of the religion and the exodus of the tribes etc but gets stuck in a Levitical genealogical dystopia from which she can't quite disentangle herself. This unfortunately isn't the book to turn to if you're seeking a quick introduction to Islamic history and, consequently, its influence upon and possible insight into the modern muslim mind - that's what I was looking for from this book.

Perhaps I went in with the wrong expectation. Apr 07, Travis Hamilton rated it really liked it. A great book for an unbiased introduction to Islam and its history. The book gives the uninformed reader of Islam a great read from a nice objective perspective. The author seems to know what she is writing about and is a rather easy and interesting read.

I was a bit skeptical trying to find an honest book on Islam with so many out there that are very biased one way or the other. This was a great intro into who the great man Mohammad was and his teachings. Like most religions, there are numerous A great book for an unbiased introduction to Islam and its history. Like most religions, there are numerous breaks, changes and transformations over the hundreds of years that Islam has been around. There are many different 'sects' of Islam, many of which seem to be very different and not in agreement with one another.

I would recommend this book for anyone wanting to get an honest perspective of Islam and break down many false stereotypes that the media has created and labeled from a few extreme Islamic groups that do NOT represent the millions of other Islamic followers in the world today. Nov 16, Saz rated it really liked it Shelves: Highly recommend for anyone who wants to know more about Islam. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It was very honest and unbiased and I truly appreciated that, especially having been written by a western author.

What I particularly liked about this book is that it inherently seeks to destroy western myths and stereotypes about Islam. The Prophet pbuh was a brilliant man to which every Muslim seeks to be like.

He was the one, under the name of Allah and the Quran, who brought Muslims, part Highly recommend for anyone who wants to know more about Islam. He was the one, under the name of Allah and the Quran, who brought Muslims, particularly Arabs, together - something unheard of back in primitive times, when Arabs were loyal to their tribe and only their tribe.

It illustrates how beautiful, peaceful and freeing Islam really is.Oct 20, Mark rated it really liked it Shelves: Husain is a gifted writer and perceptive observer particularly of the Arab Middle East. The author is a biased apologist for Christianity and Islam; although it's good to hear another view, she is simply too biased for her books to be read alone.

Islam: A Short History

Shadi ke Liye Razi Karne ka Wazifa. The moderate voices on all sides are drowned by the fear-stricken shouts of the bigots just witness the hysteria over Iran.

Translated By Heba Samir Hendawi A historical book, detailing the "openings" or liberations of key Islamic cities in the glorious history of Islam.

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