30 ARDUINO PROJECTS FOR THE EVIL GENIUS PDF

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To my late father, Hugh Monk, from whom I inherited a love for electronics. He would have had so Raspberry Pi® Projects for the Evil Genius. This coversheet was created by Verical, a division of Arrow Electronics, Inc. (“ Verical”). The attached document was created by the part supplier, not Verical, and. He is also author of 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius and 15 Arduino ( Figure 1) is a small microcontroller board with a USB plug to connect to your.


30 Arduino Projects For The Evil Genius Pdf

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19MB Size Report. DOWNLOAD PDF 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius . Read more Electronic Circuits for the Evil Genius: 64 Lessons with Projects. 30 Arduino™ Projects for the Evil Genius, Second Edition, gets you started right away with the simplified C programming you need to know and demonstrates. Fully updated throughout, this do-it-yourself guide shows you how to program and build fascinating projects with the Arduino Uno and.

In the next chapter, step-by-step instructions are provided for installing the software on all three platforms. There are, in fact, several different designs of Arduino board.

These are intended for different types of applications. They can all be programmed from the same Arduino development software, and in general, programs that work on one board will work on all. In this book we mostly use the Arduino Duemilanove, sometimes called Arduino , which is an update of the popular board, the Diecimila. Duemilanove is Italian for , the year of its release.

The older Diecimila name means 10, in Italian, and was named that after 10, boards had been manufactured. Most compatible boards such as the Freeduino are based on the Diecimila and Duemilanove designs.

Most of the projects in this book will work with a Diecimila, Duemilanove, or their clone designs, apart from one project that uses the Arduino Lilypad. When you are making a project with an Arduino, you will need to download programs onto the board using a USB lead between your computer and the Arduino.

This is one of the most convenient things about using an Arduino. Many microcontroller boards use separate programming hardware to get programs into the microcontroller. This also has the advantage that you can use the USB connection to pass data back and forth between an Arduino board and your computer.

For instance, you could connect a temperature sensor to the Arduino and have it repeatedly tell your computer the temperature. On the older Diecimila boards, you will find a jumper switch immediately below the USB socket. There is a large community of construction, programming, electronics, and even art enthusiasts willing to share their expertise and experience on the Internet.

[PDF] 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius, Second Edition Popular Colection

To begin using Arduino, first go to the Arduino site www. You can then either download an official Arduino by clicking the download An xi 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius Arduino button or spend some time with your favorite search engine or an online auction site to find lower-cost alternatives. In the next chapter, step-by-step instructions are provided for installing the software on all three platforms.

There are, in fact, several different designs of Arduino board. These are intended for different types of applications. They can all be programmed from the same Arduino development software, and in general, programs that work on one board will work on all.

In this book we mostly use the Arduino Duemilanove, sometimes called Arduino , which is an update of the popular board, the Diecimila. Duemilanove is Italian for , the year of its release. The older Diecimila name means 10, in Italian, and was named that after 10, boards had been manufactured. Most compatible boards such as the Freeduino are based on the Diecimila and Duemilanove designs.

Most of the projects in this book will work with a Diecimila, Duemilanove, or their clone designs, apart from one project that uses the Arduino Lilypad. When you are making a project with an Arduino, you will need to download programs onto the board using a USB lead between your computer and the Arduino. This is one of the most convenient things about using an Arduino.

Many microcontroller boards use separate programming hardware to get programs into the microcontroller. The Arduino software does not distinguish between different versions of Windows. The download should work for all versions, from Windows XP onwards. The following instructions are for Windows XP.

Figure Downloading the Arduino software for Windows. Then click Next again. This will create a new directory for this version of Arduino in this case, 17 in the folder C: This allows you to have multiple versions of Arduino installed at the same time, each in its own folder.

30 Arduino projects for the evil genius 2010 Simon Monk .pdf

Updates of Arduino are fairly infrequent and historically have always kept compatibility with earlier versions of the software. So unless there is a new feature of the software that you want to use, or you have been having problems, it is by no means essential to keep up with the latest version.

Figure Now that we have got the Arduino folder in the right place, we need to install the USB drivers. Extracting the Arduino file in Windows. Figure Setting the directory for extraction. On the next screen Figure , click the option to install from a specified location, enter or browse to the location C: Note that you will have to change in the path noted if you download a different version.

Figure The Extract All menu option in Windows. The installation will then complete and you are ready to start up the Arduino software itself.

To do this, go to My Computer, navigate to C: The Arduino software will now start. Note that there is no shortcut created for the Arduino program, so you may wish to select the Arduino program icon, right-click, and create a shortcut that you can then drag to your desktop. Figure Setting the location of the USB drivers.

The next two sections describe this same procedure for installing on Mac and LINUX computers, so if you are a Windows user, you can skip these sections. Starting the Arduino software from Windows. In the case of the Mac, it is a disk image file. Once downloaded, it will mount the disk image and open a Finder window, as shown in Figure The Arduino application itself is installed in the usual Mac way by dragging it from the disk image to your Applications folder.

The disk image also contains two installer packages for the USB drivers see Figure Be sure to choose the package for your system architecture. Unless you are using a Mac built before March , you will need to use the Intel version rather than the PPC version.

When you run the installer, you can simply click Continue until you come to the Select Disk screen, where you must select the hard disk before clicking Continue. As this software installs a kernel extension, it will prompt you to enter your password before completing the installation.

You can now find and launch the Arduino software in your Applications folder. As you are going to use it frequently, you may wish to rightclick its icon in the dock and set it to Keep In Dock. So, if you are lucky, all you will need to do is download the TGZ file for the Arduino software from the Arduino home page www.

If you use many USB or Bluetooth devices with your Mac, you are likely to have quite a few options in this list. From the Tools menu, we can now select the board that we are going to use, as shown in Figure If you are using the newer Duemilanove, choose the first option. However, if you are using the older Diecimila board, select the second option.

Configuring Your Arduino Environment Downloading the Project Software Whatever type of computer you use, you should now have the Arduino software installed on it. We now need to make a few settings. We need to specify the operating system name for the port that is connected to the USB port for communicating with the Arduino board, and we need to specify the type of Arduino board that we are using.

But first, you need to connect your Arduino to your The software for all of these sketches is available for download. The whole download is less than a megabyte, so it makes sense to download the software for all of the projects, even if you only intend to use a few. To download them, browse to www. Figure Setting the serial port on the Mac.

Figure Setting the serial port on Windows. Figure Setting the board. Once the files are installed, you will be able to access them from the File Sketchbook menu on the Arduino software. Project 1 Flashing LED Having assumed that we have successfully installed the software, we can now start on our first exciting project. We are going to modify the example Blink sketch that comes with Arduino.

We will increase the frequency of the blinking and then install the modified sketch on our Arduino board. Rather than blink slowly, our board will flash its LED quickly. Software First, we need to load the Blink sketch into the Arduino software. The Blink sketch is included as an example when you install the Arduino environment. So we can load it using the File menu, as shown in Figure The majority of the text in this sketch is in the form of comments.

Comments are not actually part of the program but explain what is going on in the program to anyone reading the sketch. If all the comments in a sketch were to be removed, it would still work in exactly the same way, but we use comments because they are useful to anyone reading the sketch trying to work out what it does. Before we start, a little word about vocabulary is required. In Chapter 3 we will explore this sketch further, but for now, we will just change the delay and download the sketch to the Arduino board.

With the board connected to your computer, click the Upload button on the Arduino. This is shown in Figure This should take around 5 to 10 seconds. If this does not happen, check the serial port and board type settings as described in the previous sections.

When the completed sketch has been installed, the board will automatically reset, and if everything has worked, you will see the LED for digital port 13 start to flash much more quickly than before. Uploading the sketch to the Arduino board. In this section, we will add an external LED to the board. LEDs cannot simply have voltage applied to them; they must have a current-limiting resistor attached.

Both parts are readily available from any electronics suppliers.

The component order codes for a number of suppliers are detailed in the appendix. However, for experimentation purposes, they also allow wires or component leads to be inserted directly into the sockets. Figure shows the schematic diagram for attaching the external LED. This kind of schematic diagram uses special symbols to represent the electronic components. The LED appears rather like an arrow, which indicates that light-emitting diodes, in common with all diodes, only allow the current to flow in one direction.

The little arrows next to the LED symbol indicate that it emits light. The resistor is just depicted as a rectangle. Resistors are also often shown as a zigzag line. The rest of the lines on the diagram represent electrical connections between the components.

These connections may be lengths of wire or tracks on a circuit board. In this case, they will just be the wires of the components. We can connect the components directly to the Arduino sockets between the digital pin 12 and the GND pin, but first we need to connect one lead of the LED to one lead of the resistor.

It does not matter which lead of the resistor is connected to the LED; however, the LED must be connected the correct way. The LED will have one lead slightly longer than the other, and it is the longer lead that must be connected to digital pin 12 and the shorter lead that should be connected to the resistor.

LEDs and some other components have the convention of making the positive lead longer than the negative one. To connect the resistor to the short lead of the LED, gently spread the leads apart and twist the short lead around one of the resistor leads, as shown in Figure Figure An LED connected to a serial resistor. Sometimes, it helps to bend a slight kink into the end of the lead so that it fits more tightly into the sockets.

We can now modify our sketch to use the external LED that we have just connected. All we need to do is change the sketch so that it uses digital pin 12 instead of 13 for the LED.

To do this, we change the line: Breadboard Twisting together a few wires is not practical for anything much more than a single LED. A breadboard allows us to build complicated circuits without the need for soldering. In fact, it is a good idea to build all circuits on a breadboard first to get the design right and then commit the design to solder once everything is working. A breadboard comprises a plastic block with holes in it, with sprung metal connections behind.

30 Arduino™ Projects for the Evil Genius - myp-tech

Underneath the breadboard holes, there are strips of connectors, so each of the holes in a strip are connected together. The strips have a gap between them so that integrated circuits in dual-inline packaging can be inserted without leads on the same row being shorted together. We can build this project on a breadboard rather than with twisted wires. Figure shows a photograph of this.

30 Arduino™ Projects for the Evil Genius - myp-tech

Figure makes it a little easier to see how the components are positioned and connected together. You will notice that at the edges of the breadboard top and bottom , there are two long horizontal strips. The connections on the back of these long strips run at right angles to the normal strips of connections and are used to provide power to the components on the breadboard. There are little linking wires between the left and right halves of the GND strip, as on this Figure Project 1 breadboard layout.

In addition to a breadboard, you will need some solid-core wire and some wire strippers or pliers to cut and remove the insulation from the ends of the wire. It is a good idea to have at least three different colors: This makes it much easier to understand the layout of the circuit.

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You can also download prepared short lengths of solid-core wire in a variety of colors. Note that it is not advisable to use multicore wire, as it will tend to bunch up when you try to push it into the breadboard holes.

Chapter 1 Possible sources of these materials are included in the appendix. We can straighten out the wires of our LED and resistor and plug them into a breadboard. It is best to use a reasonable-sized breadboard and attach the Arduino board to it. You probably do not want to attach the board permanently, so I use a small lump of adhesive putty. Summary We have created our first project, albeit a very simple one. In the next chapter we will get a bit more background on the Arduino before moving on to some more interesting projects.

In fact, the board basically just provides support to the microcontroller, extending its pins to the connectors so that you can connect hardware to them and providing a USB link for downloading sketches, etc. We also learn a few things about the C language used to program the Arduino, something we will build on in later chapters as we start on some practical project work. Inputs can read both digital is the switch on or off? This enables us to connect many different types of sensors for light, temperature, sound, etc.

Although this chapter gets quite theoretical at times, it will help you understand how your projects work. However, if you would prefer just to get on with your projects, you may wish to skim this chapter.

Outputs can also be analog or digital. So, you can set a pin to be on or off 0V or 5V and this can turn LEDs on and off directly, or you can use the output to control higher-power devices such as motors. They can also provide an analog output voltage. That is, you can set the output of a pin to some particular voltage, allowing you to control the speed of a motor or the brightness of a light, for example, rather than simply turning it on or off.

Microcontrollers The heart of our Arduino is a microcontroller. Practically everything else on the board is concerned with providing the board with power and allowing it to communicate with your desktop computer.

So what exactly do we get when we download one of these little computers to use in our projects? Figure shows our Arduino board—or in this case an Arduino clone. Let us have a quick tour of the various components on the board. The answer is that we really do get a little computer on a chip.

It has everything and more than the first home computers had. This regulates whatever voltage between 7 and 12 volts is supplied from the power socket into a constant 5V.

So if that is the case, you might be wondering why 5V? You cannot make that using 1. Well, the answer lies in the fact that in the early days of computing, a range of chips became available, each of which contained logic gates. These chips used something called TTL Transistor-Transistor Logic , which was a bit fussy about its voltage requirements and required something between 4.

So 5V became the standard voltage for all digital electronics. These days, the type of logic gates used in chips has changed and they are far more tolerant of different voltages. The 5V voltage regulator chip is actually quite big for a surface-mount component. This is so that it can dissipate the heat required to regulate the voltage at a reasonably high current, which is useful when driving our external electronics.

Power Connections Next, let us look at the connectors at the bottom of Figure You can read the connection names next to the connectors. The first is Reset. This does the same thing as pressing the Reset button on the Arduino. Rather like rebooting a PC, it resets the microcontroller, beginning its program from the start. The rest of the pins in this section provide different voltages 3. GND, or ground, just means zero volts. It is the reference voltage to which all other voltages on the board are relative.

At this point, it would be useful to remind the reader about the difference between voltage and current. There is no perfect analogy for the behavior of electrons in a wire, but the author finds an analogy with water in pipes to be helpful, particularly in dealing with voltage, current, and resistance.

Figure summarizes the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance. The left side of the diagram shows a circuit of pipes, where the top of the diagram is higher up in elevation than the bottom of the diagram. So water will naturally flow from the top of the diagram to the bottom. Two factors determine how much water passes any point in the circuit in a given time the current: This is like voltage in electronics. On the other hand, the greater the resistance offered by the pipework, the lower the current.

In the right half of Figure , we can see the electronic equivalent of our pipework. In this case, current is actually a measure of how many electrons flow past a point per second.

And yes, resistance is the resistance to the flow of electrons. Instead of height or pressure, we have a concept of voltage.

The bottom of the diagram is at 0V, or ground, and we have shown the top of the diagram as being at 5V. So the current that flows I will be the voltage difference 5 divided by the resistance R. Generally, though, the Arduino boards are remarkably tolerant of accidental abuse. So, going back to our Arduino power pins, we can see that the Arduino board will supply us with useful voltages of 3.

We can use any of those supplies to cause a current to flow, as long as we are careful not to make it a short circuit no resistance to flow , which would cause a potentially large current to flow that could cause damage. In other words, we have to make sure that anything we connect to the supply has enough resistance to prevent too much current from flowing. As well as supplying a particular voltage, each of those supply connections will have a maximum current that can be allowed to flow.

Those currents are 50 mA thousandths of an amp for the 3.Project 3 Morse Code Translator. GND, or ground, just means zero volts. Simon is the author of the Variables and Data Types We have already met the variable ledPin and declared it to be of type int.

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