SILMARILLION BOOK PDF

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The Silmarillion is J.R.R. Tolkien's tragic, operatic history of the First to present, within The Silmarilli. Tolkien'in en önemli çalışması olarak kabul edilen Silmarillion, onun yarattığı dünyanın özüdür. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away. It became clear to me that to attempt to present, within the covers of a single book the diversity of the materials - to show The Silmarillion as in truth a continuing. The Silmarillion is Tolkien’s first book and his last. Edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien, the book finally appeared four years after the author’s death. How can I download The Silmarillion in PDF format?.


Silmarillion Book Pdf

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The Silmarillion, foundation of the imagined world of J. R. R. Tolkien, was Silmarillion from its origins in The Book of Lost Tales; but while one may indeed. This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out or otherwise circulated without the publisher's. J.R.R. Tolkien - The Book of Unfinished Tales. Home · J.R.R. Tolkien - The Book of Unfinished Tales Tolkien, JRR - The Silmarillion. Read more.

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Books by Language. Full text of " The Silmarillion " See other formats J. Tolkien's tragic, operatic history of the First Age of Middle-Earth, essential background material for serious readers of the classic Lord of the Rings saga. Tolkien's work sets the standard for fantasy, and this audio version of the "Bible of Middle- Earth" does The Silmarillion justice.

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Martin Shaw's reading is grave and resonant, conveying all the powerful events and emotions that shaped elven and human history long before Bilbo, Frodo, Gandalf and all the rest embarked on their quests. Even the love between a human warrior and the daughter of the Elven king cannot defeat Morgoth, but the War of Wrath finally brings down the Dark Lord. Peace reigns until the evil Sauron recovers the Rings of Power and sets the stage for the events told in the Lord of the Rings.

This is epic fantasy at its finest, thrillingly read and gloriously unabridged.

In The Lord of the Rings were narrated the great events at the end of the Third Age; but the tales of The Silmarillion are legends deriving from a much deeper past, when Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwelt in Middle-earth, and the High Elves made war upon him for the recovery of the Silmarils. Not only, however, does The Silmarillion relate the events of a far earlier time than those of The Lord of the Rings ; it is also, in all the essentials of its conception, far the earlier work.

Indeed, although it was not then called The Silmarillion, it was already in being half a century ago; and in battered notebooks extending back to can still be read the earliest versions, often hastily pencilled, of the central stories of the mythology. But it was never published though some indication of its content could be gleaned from The Lord of the Rings , and throughout my father's long life he never abandoned it, nor ceased even in his last years to work on it.

In all that time The Silmarillion, considered simply as a large narrative structure, underwent relatively little radical change; it became long ago a fixed tradition, and background to later writings. But it was far indeed from being a fixed text, and did not remain unchanged even in certain fundamental ideas concerning the nature of the world it portrays; while the same legends came to be retold in longer and shorter forms, and in different styles. As the years passed the changes and variants, both in detail and in larger perspectives, became so complex, so pervasive, and so many-layered that a final and definitive version seemed unattainable.

Moreover the old legends 'old' now not only in their derivation from the remote First Age, but also in terms of my father's life became the vehicle and depository of his profoundest reflections.

In his later writing mythology and poetry sank down behind his theological and philosophical preoccupations: On my father's death it fell to me to try to bring the work into publishable form.

It became clear to me that to attempt to present, within the covers of a single book the diversity of the materials - to show The Silmarillion as in truth a continuing and evolving creation extending over more than half a century - would in fact lead only to confusion and the submerging of what is essential I set myself therefore to work out a single text selecting and arranging in such a way as seemed to me to produce the most coherent and internally self-consistent narrative.

In this work the concluding chapters from the death of Turin Turambar introduced peculiar difficulties, in that they had remained unchanged for many years, and were in some respects in serious disharmony with more developed conceptions in other parts of the book. A complete consistency either within the compass of The Silmarillion itself or between The Silmarillion and other published writings of my father's is not to be looked for, and could only be achieved, if at all at heavy and needless cost.

Moreover, my father came to conceive The Silmarillion as a compilation, a compendious narrative, made long afterwards from sources of great diversity poems, and annals, and oral tales that had survived in agelong tradition; and this conception has indeed its parallel in the actual history of the book, for a great deal of earlier prose and poetry does underlie it, and it is to some extent a compendium in fact and not only in theory.

To this may be ascribed the varying speed of the narrative and fullness of detail in different parts, the contrast for example of the precise recollections of place and motive in the legend of Turin Turambar beside the high and remote account of the end of the First Age, when Thangorodrim was broken and Morgoth overthrown; and also some differences of tone and portrayal, some obscurities, and, here and there, some lack of cohesion.

In the case of the Valaquenta, for instance, we have to assume that while it contains much that must go back to the earliest days of the Eldar in Valinor, it was remodelled in later times; and thus explain its continual shifting of tense and viewpoint, so that the divine powers seem now present and active in the world, now remote, a vanished order known only to memory.

The book, though entitled as it must be The Silmarillion, contains not only the Quenta Silmarillion, or Silmarillion proper, but also four other short works. The Ainulindale and Valaquenta, which are given at the beginning, are indeed closely related with The Silmarillion ; but the Akallabeth and Of the Rings of Power, which appear at the end, are it must to emphasised wholly separate and independent. They are included according to my father's explicit intention; and by their inclusion is set forth the entire history is set forth from the Music of the Ainur in which the world began to the passing of the Ring bearers from the havens of Mithlond at the end of the Third Age.

The number of names that occur in the book is very large, and I have provided a full index; but the number of persons Elves and Men who play an important part in the narrative of the First Age is very much smaller, and all of these will be found in the genealogical tables.

In addition I have provided a table setting out the rather complex naming of the different Elvish peoples; a note on the pronunciation of Elvish names, and a list of some of the chief elements found in these names; and a map. It may be noted that the great mountain range in the east, Ered Luin or Ered Lindon, the Blue Mountains, appears in the extreme west of the map in The Lord of the Rings.

In the body of the book there is a smaller map: I have not burdened the book further with any sort of commentary or annotation. There is indeed a wealth of unpublished writing by my father concerning the Three Ages, narrative, linguistic, historical, and philosophical, and I hope that it will prove possible to publish some of this at a later date.

In the difficult and doubtful task of preparing the text of the book I was very greatly assisted by Guy Kay, who worked with me in And he spoke to them, propounding to them themes of music; and they sang before him, and he was glad.

But for a long while they sang only each alone, or but few together, while the rest hearkened; for each comprehended only that part of me mind of lluvatar from which he came, and in the understanding of their brethren they grew but slowly. Yet ever as they listened they came to deeper understanding, and increased in unison and harmony.

And it came to pass that lluvatar called together all the Ainur and declared to them a mighty theme, unfolding to them things greater and more wonderful than he had yet revealed; and the glory of its beginning and the splendour of its end amazed the Ainur, so that they bowed before lluvatar and were silent. Then lluvatar said to them: And since I have sited you with the Flame Imperishable, ye shall show forth your powers in adorning this theme, each with his own thoughts and devices, if he will.

But I win sit and hearken, and be glad that through you great beauty has been wakened into song. Never since have the Ainur made any music like to this music, though it has been said that a greater still shall be made before lluvatar by the choirs of the Ainur and the Children of lluvatar after the end of days.

Then the themes of lluvatar shall be played aright, and take Being in the moment of their utterance, for all shall then understand fully his intent in their part, and each shall know the comprehension of each, and lluvatar shall give to their thoughts the secret fire, being well pleased. But now lluvatar sat and hearkened, and for a great while it seemed good to him, for in the music there were no flaws.

But as the theme progressed, it came into the heart of Melkor to interweave matters of his own imagining that were not in accord with the theme of lluvatar, for he sought therein to increase the power and glory of the part assigned to himself. To Melkor among the Ainur had been given the greatest gifts of power and knowledge, and he had a share in all the gifts of his brethren.

He had gone often alone into the void places seeking the Imperishable Flame; for desire grew hot within him to bring into Being things of his own, and it seemed to him that lluvatar took no thought for the Void, and he was impatient of its emptiness. Yet he found not the Fire, for it is with lluvatar. But being alone he had begun to conceive thoughts of his own unlike those of his brethren. Some of these thoughts he now wove into his music, and straightway discord arose about him, and many that sang nigh him grew despondent, and their thought was disturbed and their music faltered; but some began to attune their music to his rather than to the thought which they had at first.

Then the discord of Melkor spread ever wider, and the melodies which had been heard before foundered in a sea of turbulent sound. But lluvatar sat and hearkened until it seemed that about his throne there was a raging storm, as of dark waters that made war one upon another in an endless wrath that would not be assuaged.

Then lluvatar arose, and the Ainur perceived that he smiled; and he lifted up his left hand, and a new theme began amid the storm, like and yet unlike to the former theme, and it gathered power and had new beauty. But the discord of Melkor rose in uproar and contended with it, and again there was a war of sound more violent than before, until many of the Ainur were dismayed and sang no longer, and Melkor had the mastery.

Then again lluvatar arose, and the Ainur perceived that his countenance was stem; and he lifted up his right hand, and behold! For it seemed at first soft and sweet, a mere rippling of gentle sounds in delicate melodies; but it could not be quenched, and it took to itself power and profundity. And it seemed at last that there were two musics progressing at one time before the seat of lluvatar, and they were utterly at variance. The one was deep and wide and beautiful, but slow and blended with an immeasurable sorrow, from which its beauty chiefly came.

The other had now achieved a unity of its own; but it was loud, and vain, and endlessly repeated; and it had little harmony, but rather a clamorous unison as of many trumpets braying upon a few notes.

And it essayed to drown the other music by the violence of its voice, but it seemed that its most triumphant notes were taken by the other and woven into its own solemn pattern. In the midst of this strife, whereat the halls of lluvatar shook and a tremor ran out into the silences yet unmoved, lluvatar arose a third time, and his face was terrible to behold. Then he raised up both his hands, and in one chord, deeper than the Abyss, higher than the Firmament, piercing as the light of the eye of lluvatar, the Music ceased.

Then lluvatar spoke, and he said: And thou, Melkor, shalt see that no theme may be played that hath not its uttermost source in me, nor can any alter the music in my despite. For he that attempteth this shall prove but mine instrument in the devising of things more wonderful, which he himself hath not imagined.

But lluvatar arose in splendour, and he went forth from the fair regions that he had made for the Ainur; and the Ainur followed him. But when they were come into the Void, lluvatar said to them: And as they looked and wondered this World began to unfold its history, and it seemed to them that it lived and grew.

And when the Ainur had gazed for a while and were silent, lluvatar said again: This is your minstrelsy; and each of you shall find contained herein, amid the design that I set before you, all those things which it may seem that he himself devised or added. And thou, Melkor, wilt discover all the secret thoughts of thy mind, and wilt perceive that they are but a part of the whole and tributary to its glory. Yet some things there are that they cannot see, neither alone nor taking counsel together; for to none but himself has lluvatar revealed all that he has in store, and in every age there come forth things that are new and have no foretelling, for they do not proceed from the past.

And so it was that as this vision of the World was played before them, the Ainur saw that it contained things which they had not thought. And they saw with amazement the coming of the Children of lluvatar, and the habitation that was prepared for them; and they perceived that they themselves in the labour of their music had been busy with the preparation of this dwelling, and yet knew not that it had any purpose beyond its own beauty.

For the Children of lluvatar were conceived by him alone; and they came with the third theme, and were not in the theme which lluvatar propounded at the beginning, and none of the Ainur had part in their making.

Therefore when they beheld them, the more did they love them, being things other than themselves, strange and free, wherein they saw the mind of lluvatar reflected anew, and learned yet a little more of his wisdom, which otherwise had been hidden even from the Ainur. And amid all the splendours of the World, its vast halls and spaces, and its wheeling fires, lluvatar chose a place for their habitation in the Deeps of Time and in the midst of the innumerable stars. And this habitation might seem a little thing to those who consider only the majesty of the Ainur, and not their terrible sharpness; as who should take the whole field of Arda for the foundation of a pillar and so raise it until the cone of its summit were more bitter than a needle; or who consider only the immeasurable vastness of the World, which still the Ainur are shaping, and not the minute precision to which they shape all things therein.

But when the Ainur had beheld this habitation in a vision and had seen the Children of lluvatar arise therein, then many of the most mighty among them bent all their thought and their desire towards that place. And of these Melkor was the chief, even as he was in the beginning the greatest of the Ainur who took part in the Music.

And he feigned, even to himself at first, that he desired to go thither and order all things for the good of the Children of lluvatar, controlling the turmoils of the heat and the cold that had come to pass through him.

But he desired rather to subdue to his will both Elves and Men, envying the gifts with which lluvatar promised to endow them; and he wished himself to have subject and servants, and to be called Lord, and to be a master over other wills. But the other Ainur looked upon this habitation set within the vast spaces of the World, which the Elves call Arda, the Earth; and their hearts rejoiced in light, and their eyes beholding many colours were filled with gladness; but because of the roaring of the sea they felt a great unquiet.

And they observed the winds and the air, and the matters of which Arda was made, of iron and stone and silver and gold and many substances: And it is said by the Eldar that in water there lives yet the echo of the Music of the Ainur more than in any substance else that is in this Earth; and many of the Children of lluvatar hearken still unsated to the voices of the Sea, and yet know not for what they listen.

Now to water had that Ainu whom the Elves can Ulmo turned his thought, and of all most deeply was he instructed by lluvatar in music. But of the airs and winds Manwe most had pondered, who is the noblest of the Ainur. Of the fabric of Earth had Aule thought, to whom lluvatar had given skin and knowledge scarce less than to Melkor; but the delight and pride of Aule is in the deed of making, and in the thing made, and neither in possession nor in his own mastery; wherefore he gives and hoards not, and is free from care, passing ever on to some new work.

And lluvatar spoke to Ulmo, and said: He hath bethought him of bitter cold immoderate, and yet hath not destroyed the beauty of thy fountains, nor of my clear pools.

Behold the snow, and the cunning work of frost! Melkor hath devised heats and fire without restraint, and hath not dried up thy desire nor utterly quelled the music of the sea. Behold rather the height and glory of the clouds, and the everchanging mists; and listen to the fall of rain upon the Earth! And in these clouds thou art drawn nearer to Manwe, thy friend, whom thou lovest.

Truly, Water is become now fairer than my heart imagined, neither had my secret thought conceived the snowflake, nor in all my music was contained the falling of the rain.

I will seek Manwe, that he and I may make melodies for ever to my delight! But even as Ulmo spoke, and while the Ainur were yet gazing upon this vision, it was taken away and hidden from their sight; and it seemed to them that in that moment they perceived a new thing, Darkness, which they had not known before except in thought. But they had become enamoured of the beauty of the vision and engrossed in the unfolding of the World which came there to being, and their minds were filled with it; for the history was incomplete and the circles of time not full-wrought when the vision was taken away.

And some have said that the vision ceased ere the fulfilment of the Dominion of Men and the fading of the Firstborn; wherefore, though the Music is over all, the Valar have not seen as with sight the Later Ages or the ending of the World.

Then there was unrest among the Ainur; but lluvatar called to them, and said: Therefore I say: Let these things Be! And I will send forth into the Void the Flame Imperishable, and it shall be at the heart of the World, and the World shall Be; and those of you that will may go down into it. And suddenly the Ainur saw afar off a light, as it were a cloud with a living heart of flame; and they knew that this was no vision only, but that lluvatar had made a new thing: Ea, the World that Is.

Thus it came to pass that of the Ainur some abode still with lluvatar beyond the confines of the World; but others, and among them many of the greatest and most fair, took the leave of lluvatar and descended into it. But this condition lluvatar made, or it is the necessity of their love, that their power should thenceforward be contained and bounded in the World, to be within it for ever, until it is complete, so that they are its life and it is theirs. And therefore they are named the Valar, the Powers of the World.

But when the Valar entered into Ea they were at first astounded and at a loss, for it was as if naught was yet made which they had seen in vision, and all was but on point to begin and yet unshaped, and it was dark.

For the Great Music had been but the growth and flowering of thought in the Tuneless Halls, and the Vision only a foreshowing; but now they had entered in at the beginning of Time, and the Valar perceived that the World had been but foreshadowed and foresung, and they must achieve it.

So began their great labours in wastes unmeasured and unexplored, and in ages uncounted and forgotten, until in the Deeps of Time and in the midst of the vast halls of Ea there came to be that hour and that place where was made the habitation of the Children of lluvatar. And in this work the chief part was taken by Manwe and Aule and Ulmo; but Melkor too was there from the first, and he meddled in all that was done, turning it if he might to his own desires and purposes; and he sited great fires.

When therefore Earth was yet young and full of flame Melkor coveted it, and he said to the other Valar: This shall be my own kingdom; and I name it unto myself! And Manwe said unto Melkor: This kingdom thou shalt not take for thine own, wrongfully, for many others have laboured here do less than thou. Now the Valar took to themselves shape and hue; and because they were drawn into the World by love of the Children of lluvatar, for whom they hoped, they took shape after that manner which they had beheld in the Vision of lluvatar, save only in majesty and splendour.

Moreover their shape comes of their knowledge of the visible World, rather than of the World itself; and they need it not, save only as we use raiment, and yet we may be naked and suffer no loss of our being.

Therefore the Valar may walk, if they will, unclad, and then even the Eldar cannot clearly perceive them, though they be present. But when they desire to clothe themselves the Valar take upon them forms some as of male and some as of female; for that difference of temper they had even from their beginning, and it is but bodied forth in the choice of each, not made by the choice, even as with us male and female may be shown by the raiment but is not made thereby.

But the shapes wherein the Great Ones array themselves are not at all times like to the shapes of the kings and queens of the Children of lluvatar; for at times they may clothe themselves in their own thought, made visible in forms of majesty and dread.

And the Valar drew unto them many companions, some less, some well nigh as great as themselves, and they laboured together in the ordering of the Earth and the curbing of its tumults. Then Melkor saw what was done, and that the Valar walked on Earth as powers visible, clad in the raiment of the World, and were lovely and glorious to see, and blissful, and that the Earth was becoming as a garden for their delight, for its turmoils were subdued.

His envy grew then the greater within him; and he also took visible form, but because of his mood and the malice that burned in him that form was dark and terrible. And he descended upon Arda in power and majesty greater than any other of the Valar, as a mountain that wades in the sea and has its head above the clouds and is clad in ice and crowned with smoke and fire; and the light of the eyes of Melkor was like a flame that withers with heat and pierces with a deadly cold.

Thus began the first battle of the Valar with Melkor for the dominion of Arda; and of those tumults the Elves know but little. For what has here been declared is come from the Valar themselves, with whom the Eldalie spoke in the land of Valinor, and by whom they were instructed; but little would the Valar ever tell of the wars before the coming of the Elves. Yet it is told among the Eldar that the Valar endeavoured ever, in despite of Melkor, to rule the Earth and to prepare it for the coming of the Firstborn; and they built lands and Melkor destroyed them; valleys they delved and Melkor raised them up; mountains they carved and Melkor threw them down; seas they hollowed and Melkor spilled them; and naught might have peace or come to lasting growth, for as surely as the Valar began a labour so would Melkor undo it or corrupt it.

And yet their labour was not all in vain; and though nowhere and in no work was their will and purpose wholly fulfilled, and all things were in hue and shape other than the Valar had at first intended, slowly nonetheless the Earth was fashioned and made firm. And thus was the habitation of the Children of lluvatar established at the last in the Deeps of Time and amidst the innumerable stars. In this Music the World was begun; for lluvatar made visible the song of the Ainur, and they beheld it as a light in the darkness.

And many among them became enamoured of its beauty, and of its history which they saw beginning and unfolding as in a vision. Therefore lluvatar gave to their vision Being, and set it amid the Void, and the Secret Fire was sent to burn at the heart of the World; and it was called Ea. Then those of the Ainur who desired it arose and entered into the World at the beginning of Time; and it was their task to achieve it, and by their labours to fulfil the vision which they had seen.

Long they laboured in the regions of Ea, which are vast beyond the thought of Elves and Men, until in the time appointed was made Arda, the Kingdom of Earth. Then they put on the raiment of Earth and descended into it, and dwelt therein. These were their names in the Elvish tongue as it was spoken in Valinor, though they have other names in the speech of the Elves in Middle-earth, and their names among Men are manifold. The names of the Lords in due order are: Melkor is counted no longer among the Valar, and his name is not spoken upon Earth.

Manwe and Melkor were brethren in the thought of lluvatar. The mightiest of those Ainur who came into the World was in his beginning Melkor; but Manwe is dearest to lluvatar and understands most clearly his purposes. He was appointed to be, in the fullness of time, the first of all Kings: In Arda his delight is in the winds and the clouds, and in all the regions of the air, from the heights to the depths, from the utmost borders of the Veil of Arda to the breezes that blow in the grass.

Sulimo he is surnamed, Lord of the Breath of Arda. All swift birds, strong of wing, he loves, and they come and go at his bidding.

Too great is her beauty to be declared in the words of Men or of Elves; for the light of lluvatar lives still in her face. In light is her power and her joy. Out of the deeps of Ea she came to the aid of Manwe; for Melkor she knew from before the making of the Music and rejected him, and he hated her, and feared her more than all others whom Eru made.

Manwe and Varda are seldom parted, and they remain in Valinor. Their halls are above the everlasting snow, upon Oiolosse, the uttermost tower of Taniquetil, tallest of all the mountains upon Earth. When Manwe there ascends his throne and looks forth, if Varda is beside him, he sees further than all other eyes, through mist, and through darkness, and over the leagues of the sea.

And if Manwe is with her, Varda hears more clearly than all other ears the sound of voices that cry from east to west, from the hills and the valleys, and from the dark places that Melkor has made upon Earth. Of all the Great Ones who dwell in this world the Elves hold Varda most in reverence and love. Elbereth they name her, and they call upon her name out of the shadows of Middle-earth, and uplift it in song at the rising of the stars.

Ulmo is the Lord of Waters. He is alone. He dwells nowhere long, but moves as he will in all the deep waters about the Earth or under the Earth. He is next in might to Manwe, and before Valinor was made he was closest to him in friendship; but thereafter he went seldom to the councils of the Valar, unless great matters were in debate. For he kept all Arda in thought, and he has no need of any resting-place.

Moreover he does not love to walk upon land, and will seldom clothe himself in a body after the manner of his peers. If the Children of Eru beheld him they were filled with a great dread; for the arising of the King of the Sea was terrible, as a mounting wave that strides to the land, with dark helm foam-crested and raiment of mail shimmering from silver down into shadows of green.

The trumpets of Manwe are loud, but Ulmo's voice is deep as the deeps of the ocean which he only has seen. Nonetheless Ulmo loves both Elves and Men, and never abandoned them, not even when they lay under the wrath of the Valar. At times he win come unseen to the shores of Middle-earth, or pass far inland up firths of the sea, and there make music upon his great horns, the Ulumuri, that are wrought of white shell; and those to whom that music comes hear it ever after in their hearts, and longing for the sea never leaves them again.

But mostly Ulmo speaks to those who dwell in Middle-earth with voices that are heard only as the music of water. For all seas, lakes, rivers, fountains and springs are in his government; so that the Elves say that the spirit of Ulmo runs in all the veins of the world. Thus news comes to Ulmo, even in the deeps, of all the needs and griefs of Arda, which otherwise would be hidden from Manwe. Aule has might little less than Ulmo.

His lordship is over all the substances of which Arda is made. In the beginning he wrought much in fellowship with Manwe and Ulmo; and the fashioning of all lands was his labour. He is a smith and a master of all crafts, and he delights in works of skill, however small, as much as in the mighty building of old. His are the gems that lie deep in the Earth and the gold that is fair in the hand, no less than the walls of the mountains and the basins of the sea.

The Noldor learned most of him, and he was ever their friend. Melkor was jealous of him, for Aule was most like himself in thought and in powers; and there was long strife between them, in which Melkor ever marred or undid the works of Aule, and Aule grew weary in repairing the tumults and disorders of Melkor.

Both, also, desired to make things of their own that should be new and unthought of by others, and delighted in the praise of their skill. But Aule remained faithful to Eru and submitted all that he did to his will; and he did not envy the works of others, but sought and gave counsel. Whereas Melkor spent his spirit in envy and hate, until at last he could make nothing save in mockery of the thought of others, and all their works he destroyed if he could.

The spouse of Aule is Yavanna, the Giver of Fruits. She is the lover of all things that grow in the earth, and all their countless forms she holds in her mind, from the trees like towers in forests long ago to the moss upon stones or the small and secret things in the mould. In reverence Yavanna is next to Varda among the Queens of the Valar.

In the form of a woman she is tall, and robed in green; but at times she takes other shapes. Some there are who have seen her standing like a tree under heaven, crowned with the Sun; and from all its branches there spilled a golden dew upon the barren earth, and it grew green with corn; but the roots of the tree were in the waters of Ulmo, and the winds of Manwe spoke in its leaves.

Kementari, Queen of the Earth, she is surnamed in the Eldarin tongue. The Feanturi, masters of spirits, are brethren, and they are called most often Mandos and Lorien. Yet these are rightly the names of the places of their dwelling, and their true names are Namo and Irmo. Namo the elder dwells in Mandos, which is westward in Valinor. He is the keeper of the Houses of the Dead, and the summoner of the spirits of the slain. He forgets nothing; and he knows all things that shall be, save only those that lie still in the freedom of lluvatar.

He is the Doomsman of the Valar; but he pronounces his dooms and his Judgements only at the bidding of Manwe. Vaire the Weaver is his spouse, who weaves all things that have ever been in Time into her storied webs, and the halls of Mandos that ever widen as the ages pass are clothed with them.

what do you mean “cerussite” this is clearly a silmaril.

Irmo the younger is the master of visions and dreams. In Lorien are his gardens in the land of the Valar, and they are the fairest of all places in the world, filled with many spirits. Este the gentle, healer of hurts and of weariness, is his spouse.

Grey is her raiment; and rest is her gift. She walks not by day, but sleeps upon an island in the tree- shadowed lake of Lorellin. From the fountains of Irmo and Este all those who dwell in Valinor draw refreshment; and often the Valar come themselves to Lorien and there find repose and easing of the burden of Arda. Mightier than Este is Nienna, sister of the Feanturi; she dwells alone. She is acquainted with grief, and mourns for every wound that Arda has suffered in the marring of Melkor. So great was her sorrow, as the Music unfolded, that her song turned to lamentation long before its end, and the sound of mourning was woven into the themes of the World before it began.

But she does not weep for herself; and those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope. Her halls are west of West, upon the borders of the world; and she comes seldom to the city of Valimar where all is glad. She goes rather to the halls of Mandos, which are near to her own; and all those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom. The windows of her house look outward from the walls of the world.

Greatest in strength and deeds of prowess is Tulkas, who is surnamed Astaldo, the Valiant. He came last to Arda, to aid the Valar in the first battles with Melkor.

He delights in wrestling and in contests of strength; and he rides no steed, for he can outrun all things that go on feet, and he is tireless. His hair and beard are golden, and his flesh ruddy; his weapons are his hands. He has little heed for either the past or the future, and is of no avail as a counsellor, but is a hardy friend. His spouse is Nessa, the sister of Orome, and she also is lithe and fleetfooted. It is true that the book cannot be read casually, or simply as a random fantasy novel, and it is also true that if you are not already immersed in the language and culture of Middle Earth much in the Silmarillion will be a bit impenetrable, however it was never the purpose of the Silmarillion to be light reading or to show anything less than a grand and legendary scale of events.

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Such a mythology has it's own sweeping beauty, and one which no other fantasy writer has achieved albeit some have come close. The only major criticism I have, is that while the first 7 eighths of the book dealing with the creation of Middle Earth and the struggles of the elves and first men against Morgoth are drawn in great, if biblical detail, the final chapters feel somewhat flat by comparison, compressing as they do two ages of the world, including the entire lead up to and detail of the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings , into a tiny space by comparison.

So, while I have only admiration for those parts of the Silmarillion that are fully fleshed out, and the many beautiful accounts of the elder days, I do rather wish that was where the book stopped, leaving the rest of Tolkien's history to the work already published in LotR and the Hobbit, or perhaps, if indeed any complete accounts of the second age and the drowning of Numenor were ever completed by Tolkien outside the material in LotR, publishing that account else where as in fact was done in Sauron Defeated.

Despite this flaw though, and even admitting that there are probably those who find the style of the Silmarillion rather too dense, I still have no hesitation in awarding the book an outstanding 10, indeed I'm sorry the scale can't go higher. While the Silmarillion does somewhat serve as an extended background to Lord of the Rings, even considered under it's own merits it has a fullness of language and richness of style all it's own that it would be a shame for any lover of both middle Earth and of Language and poetry to miss.

Yes, some may call this "bloodless", "flat", those people are wrong, or simply silly, and cannot even comprehend how much detail and imagination has gone into one book so "haters" - why dont you all try creating your own language, your own maps, and even your own history see how hard that is and then I will listen to your jealous review that I pity.

Christopher Tolkien has done brilliantly, it is a masterpiece. I am more than fascinated by the level of expression of love and the beautiful against the evil and selfish.

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If I would view this book as a story or a fantasy novel even if it is not exactly the most readable. I don't and that is why I love it. This book is an amazing and touching read, more of a history than a story, but I still found a connection with the characters.

Morgoth is even blacker than Sauron, who is one of the noblest corrupted things you'll ever read about. A perfect literary work.

It is a work of indescribable majesty and breathtaking concept. Tolkien is the ultimate master of high fantasy. However, the Silmarillion is only for die-hard Tolkien fans who have already read the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings. It is more a history than a novel and goes into complex detail which, while sweet for Tolkien fans like myself, could be confusing for those new to Tolkien.

To begin, the read is slow and at times confusing due to the huge cast as it were, but slowly you begin to realise the enormity and scale of this book and anyone studying the history of our own Earth would know that such things are as complex and lengthy as any. Just when you think the plot is lost in the midsts of the many, seemingly unconnected, chapters Tolkien time and again brings back the main thrust of the epic plot.

Kudos also to Cristopher Tolkien for including the many extras which serve to aid in the understanding of the many Houses in those days and their respective histories and bloodlines. The Silmarillion aptly serves this purpose. This not a typical novel but a simple chronicle of events; a guide to the wonderful realm of Middle-earth.

This masterpiece demands only one thing: patience. The Valar obliged; they attacked and defeated Melkor, completely destroying his fortress Angband and sinking most of Beleriand ; and they expelled Melkor from Arda.

This ended the First Age of Middle-earth. However, Maedhros killed himself by leaping into a fiery chasm with a Silmaril while Maglor threw his into the sea and spent the rest of his days wandering along the shores of the world, singing his grief. As descendants of immortal elves and mortal men, they were given the choice of which lineage to belong to: Elrond chose to belong to the Elves, his brother to Men. After the defeat of Melkor, the Valar gave the island to the three loyal houses of Men who had aided the Elves in the war against him.

But their power lay in their bliss and their acceptance of mortality. Sauron urged them to wage war against the Valar themselves to win immortality, and to worship his master Melkor, whom he said could grant them their wish. This section also gives a brief overview of the events leading up to and taking place in The Lord of the Rings, including the waning of Gondor, the re-emergence of Sauron, the White Council , Saruman 's treachery, and Sauron's final destruction along with the One Ring, after which the ages of magic end.

Concept and creation[ edit ] Development of the text[ edit ] Tolkien first began working on the stories that would become The Silmarillion in , [9] intending them to become an English mythology that would explain the origins of English history and culture. Reynolds, a friend to whom Tolkien had sent several of the stories. By this time, he had doubts about fundamental aspects of the work that went back to the earliest versions of the stories, and it seems that he felt the need to resolve these problems before he could produce the "final" version of The Silmarillion.

Christopher's intentions seem to have been mostly to use the latest writings of his father's that he could,[ citation needed ] and to keep as much internal consistency and consistency with The Lord of the Rings as possible, [21] though he admitted that a complete consistency was impossible.

In one later chapter of Quenta Silmarillion, "Of the Ruin of Doriath", which had not been touched since the early s, he had to construct a narrative practically from scratch. Because of Christopher's extensive explanations in The History of Middle-earth of how he compiled the published work, much of The Silmarillion has been debated by readers.

Christopher's task is generally accepted as very difficult given the state of his father's texts at the time of his death: some critical texts were no longer in the Tolkien family's possession, and Christopher's task compelled him to rush through much of the material. Christopher reveals in later volumes of The History of Middle-earth many divergent ideas which do not agree with the published version. Christopher Tolkien has suggested that, had he taken more time and had access to all the texts, he might have produced a substantially different work.

But he was compelled by considerable pressure and demand from his father's readers and publishers to produce something publishable as quickly as possible[ citation needed ]. In October , Christopher Tolkien commissioned illustrator Ted Nasmith to create full-page full-colour artwork for the first illustrated edition of The Silmarillion. It was published in , and followed in by a second edition featuring corrections and additional artwork by Nasmith. During the s and s, Christopher Tolkien published most of his father's Middle-earth writings as the volume The History of Middle-earth series.

In addition to the source material and earlier drafts of several portions of The Lord of the Rings, these books greatly expand on the original material published in The Silmarillion, and in many cases diverge from it. There is much that Tolkien intended to revise but only sketched out in notes, and some new texts surfaced after the publication of The Silmarillion.For they say that Aule the Maker, whom they call Mahal, cares for them, and gathers them to Mandos in halls set apart; and that he declared to their Fathers of old that lluvatar will hallow them and give them a place among the Children in the End.

He was defeated in the first of five battles of Beleriand , however, and barricaded himself in his northern fortress of Angband. However she convinced the Vala Mandos to revive Beren and herself, choosing to sacrifice her immortality in favour of a mortal life with her beloved.

The Silmarillion aptly serves this purpose. Sulimo he is surnamed, Lord of the Breath of Arda.

LAWANNA from Beaumont
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