MUTCD 2009 PDF

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If you have difficulty viewing the MUTCD sections (in PDF format), you may need to download the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat Reader. The MUTCD. December The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) is Addresses for Publications Referenced in the MUTCD. The PDF version of the MUTCD with Revision Numbers 1 and 2 The most current version of the MUTCD is the Edition with.


Mutcd 2009 Pdf

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MUTCD Text Showing Revisions. Page 1 of December All of the text-related items on the “list of known errors” in the edition were. The full contents of the Edition are available in HTML format. The PDF version of the MUTCD Edition is optimized for printing on a color or. Edition. Page CHAPTER 6A. GENERAL. Section 6A General. Support: Whenever the acronym “TTC” is used in Part 6, it refers.

Activity Area—planning the internal work activity area to minimize backing-up maneuvers of construction vehicles should be considered to minimize the exposure to risk. Worker Safety Planning—a trained person designated by the employer should conduct a basic hazard assessment for the worksite and job classifications required in the activity area. This safety professional should determine whether engineering, administrative, or personal protection measures should be implemented.

A person designated by the employer to be responsible for worker safety shall make the selection of the appropriate class of garment. Standard: 06 When uniformed law enforcement personnel are used to direct traffic, to investigate crashes, or to handle lane closures, obstructed roadways, and disasters, high-visibility safety apparel as described in this Section shall be worn by the law enforcement personnel.

The shadow vehicle may be equipped with a rear-mounted impact attenuator. Road Closure—if alternate routes are available to handle road users, the road may be closed temporarily. This may also facilitate project completion and thus further reduce worker vulnerability.

Law Enforcement Use—in highly vulnerable work situations, particularly those of relatively short duration, law enforcement units may be stationed to heighten the awareness of passing vehicular traffic and to improve safety through the TTC zone.

Lighting—for nighttime work, the TTC zone and approaches may be lighted. Special Devices—these include rumble strips, changeable message signs, hazard identification beacons, flags, and warning lights.

Intrusion warning devices may be used to alert workers to the approach of errant vehicles. Approach speeds. Sight distance available on each approach. Reported crash experience. If the signal indication for an approach is a flashing red at all times; B. If a minor street or driveway is located within or adjacent to the area controlled by the traffic control signal, but does not require separate traffic signal control because an extremely low potential for conflict exists; or C.

If a channelized turn lane is separated from the adjacent travel lanes by a raised, painted, or other type island and the channelized turn lane is not controlled by a traffic control signal. X6, STOP signs and YIELD signs shall not be installed on different approaches to the same unsignalized intersection if those approaches conflict with or oppose each other. X2 Types of Unsignalized Intersection Right-of-Way Control Support: 1 The types of right-of-way control that can exist at an unsignalized intersection are listed below in order from the least restrictive to the most restrictive.

No intersection control: There are no right-of-way traffic control devices on any of the approaches to the intersection. Yield control: YIELD signs are placed on all approaches for a roundabout , on opposing approaches for a four-leg intersection , on a single approach for a three-leg intersection , or in the median of a divided highway. See Section 2B. X3 for guidance on selecting the minor road. Minor-road stop control: STOP signs are typically placed on opposing approaches for a four-leg intersection or on a single approach for a three-leg intersection.

The STOP signs are typically placed on the minor road. All-way stop control: STOP signs are placed on all approaches to the intersection. Section 2B. A roadway intersecting a designated through highway.

A roadway with the lower functional classification. A roadway that is less important. A roadway with the lower traffic volume.

Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)

A roadway with the lower speed limit. Controlling the direction that conflicts the most with established pedestrian crossing activity or school walking routes; B. Controlling the direction that has obscured vision, dips, or bumps that already require drivers to use lower operating speeds; and C.

Controlling the direction that has the best sight distance from a controlled position to observe conflicting traffic. X4 Alternatives to Changing Intersection Right-of-Way Control Guidance: 1 Before converting to a more restrictive form of right-of-way control at an unsignalized intersection, consideration should be given to the following alternative treatments to address safety, operational, or other concerns.

Removing parking on one or more approaches; C.

California mutcd 2014 edition page 845 fhwas mutcd

Removing sight distance restrictions; D. Installing warning signs along the major street to warn road users approaching the intersection; E. Relocating the stop line s and making other changes to improve the sight distance at the intersection; F.

Installing measures designed to reduce speeds on the approaches; G. Adding one or more lanes on a minor-street approach to reduce the number of vehicles per lane on the approach; J.

Revising the geometrics at the intersection to channelize vehicular movements and reduce the time required for a vehicle to complete a movement, which could also assist pedestrians; K. Installing roadway lighting if a disproportionate number of crashes occur at night; M. Restricting one or more turning movements, perhaps on a time-of-day basis, if alternate routes are available; N. Installing a pedestrian hybrid beacon see Chapter 4F or in-roadway warning lights see Chapter 4N if pedestrian safety is the major concern; O.

Converting to a roundabout; and P. Employing other alternatives, depending on conditions at the intersection. X5 No Intersection Control Guidance: 1 The decision not to use intersection control should be based on engineering judgment that indicates all of the following conditions exist: A. Intersection sight distance is adequate on all approaches. All approaches to the intersection are a single lane, and there are no separate turn lanes.

The combined vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian volume existing or projected entering the intersection from all approaches averages less than 1, units per day or 80 units in the peak hour.

There are no pedestrian or bicycle traffic control devices on any approach. None of the approaches to the intersection are for a through highway or higher functional classification roadway.

The angle of intersection is between 90 and 75 degrees. The functional classification of the intersecting streets is either the intersection of two local streets or the intersection of a local street with a collector street. Support: 2 Evaluate and consider the presence of a rail crossing near the intersection of a local street with a collector street.

X6 Yield Control Guidance: 1 At intersections where a full stop is not necessary at all times, consideration should first be given to using less restrictive measures such as YIELD signs. One of the following crash-related criteria applies: a. For changing from no intersection control to yield control, there have been two or more reported crashes that are susceptible to correction by installation of a YIELD sign in the previous 12 months.

For changing from minor-road stop control to yield control, there have been two or fewer reported crashes in the previous 12 months.

Entering intersection volume of less than 1, units per day or units in the peak hour. At the second crossroad of a divided highway, where the median width at the intersection is 30 feet or greater. For a channelized turn lane that is separated from the adjacent travel lanes by an island, even if the adjacent lanes at the intersection are controlled by a highway traffic control signal or by a STOP sign.

At an intersection where a special problem exists and where engineering judgment indicates the problem to be susceptible to correction by the use of the YIELD sign. X3 for information to identify the minor road. Yield control should be established on the approach that conflicts most with established pedestrian crossing activity or school walking routes.

YIELD signs at roundabouts shall be used to control the approach roadways and shall not be used to control the circulatory roadway. X7 Minor-Road Stop Control Guidance: 1 Stop control on the minor-road approach or approaches to an intersection should be considered when engineering judgment indicates that one or more of the following conditions exist: A.

A restricted view exists that requires road users to stop in order to adequately observe conflicting traffic on the through street or highway. Crash records indicate: a. For a four-leg intersection, there are three or more reported crashes in a month period or six or more reported crashes in a month period. The crashes are of a type susceptible to correction by installation of minor-road stop control.

For a three-leg intersection, there are three or more reported crashes in a month period or five or more reported crashes in a month period.

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The intersection of a lower functional classification road with a higher functional classification road. Conditions that previously supported installation of an all-way stop control, under all- way stop control warrants, no longer exist. Standard: 3 The satisfaction of an all-way stop control warrant or warrants shall not in itself require the installation of all-way stop control at an unsignalized intersection.

For a four-leg intersection, there are five or more reported crashes in a month period or six or more reported crashes in a month period.

The crashes should be susceptible to correction by installation of all-way stop control. For a three-leg intersection, there are four or more reported crashes in a month period or five or more reported crashes in a month period. X10 All-Way Stop Control Warrant B: Sight Distance Option: 1 All-way stop control may be established at an intersection where an engineering study indicates that sight distance on the minor-road approaches controlled by a STOP sign is not adequate for a vehicle to turn onto or cross the major uncontrolled road.

At such a location, a road user, after stopping, cannot see conflicting traffic and is not able to negotiate the intersection unless conflicting cross traffic is also required to stop. X11 All-Way Stop Control Warrant C: Transition to Signal Control Option: 1 All-way stop control may be established at locations where all-way stop control is an interim measure that can be installed to control traffic while arrangements are being made for the installation of the traffic control signals at the intersection.

The volume entering the intersection from the major-street approaches total of both approaches averages at least units per hour for any 8 hours of an average day; and B.

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The volume entering the intersection from the minor-street approaches total of both approaches averages at least units per hour for the same 8 hours; but C. If the 85th percentile approach speed of the major-street traffic exceeds 40 mph, the minimum vehicular volume warrants are 70 percent of the values provided in Items A and B. X14 All-Way Stop Control Warrant F: Other Factors Option: 3 All-way stop control may be installed at an intersection where an engineering study indicates that all-way stop control is needed due to other factors not addressed in the other all- way stop control warrants.

Such other factors may include, but are not limited to, the following: A. The need to control left-turn conflicts. An intersection of two residential neighborhood collector through streets of similar design and operating characteristics where all-way stop control would improve traffic operational characteristics of the intersection.

Those sections would be inserted before or after the proposed text or in an alternate location between the revised sections as deemed appropriate by FHWA. Deletions are shown, and notes are provided regarding the proposed location for text being moved.

When two vehicles approach an intersection from different streets or highways at approximately the same time, the right-of-way rule requires the driver of the vehicle on the left to yield the right-of-way to the vehicle on the right. The following factors should be considered: A. Vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic volumes on all approaches; B. Number and angle of approaches; C.

Approach speeds; D. Sight distance available on each approach; and E. An intersection of a less important road with a main road where application of the normal right-of-way rule would not be expected to provide reasonable compliance with the law; [Note: Similar thought was included in Section 2B. An unsignalized intersection in a signalized area. The combined vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian volume entering the intersection from all approaches averages more than 2, units per day; B.

Crash records indicate that five or more crashes that involve the failure to yield the right-of- way at the intersection under the normal right-of-way rule have been reported within a 3-year period, or that three or more such crashes have been reported within a 2-year period. Guidance: 07 Once the decision has been made to control an intersection, the decision regarding the appropriate roadway to control should be based on engineering judgment.

In most cases, the roadway carrying the lowest volume of traffic should be controlled. Controlling the direction that conflicts the most with established pedestrian crossing activity or school walking routes; [Note: Moved to Section 2B. Controlling the direction that has obscured vision, dips, or bumps that already require drivers to use lower operating speeds; and [Note: Moved to Section 2B.

If the signal indication for an approach is a flashing red at all times; [Note: Moved to Section 2B. If a minor street or driveway is located within or adjacent to the area controlled by the traffic control signal, but does not require separate traffic signal control because an extremely low potential for conflict exists; or [Note: Moved to Section 2B.Installing measures designed to reduce speeds on the approaches; G. Preston, and R. The MUTCD is a compilation of national standards for all traffic control devices, including road markings, highway signs, and traffic signals.

X13 with some changes. Lee, S.

X5 No Intersection Control Guidance: 1 The decision not to use intersection control should be based on engineering judgment that indicates all of the following conditions exist: A.

Installing roadway lighting if a disproportionate number of crashes occur at night; M.

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