LEON URIS TRINITY EBOOK

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In a novel that spans the years to , the author explores the origins of the present struggle in Northern Ireland. The "terrible beauty" that is Ireland comes alive in this mighty epic that re-creates that Emerald's Isle's fierce struggle for independence. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Nearly 20 years after Trinity, his bestselling Master storyteller Leon Uris, internationally acclaimedauthor of such bestsellers as Exodus, Topaz, QB VII,Trinity, the Haj and Mitla Pass, continues the epic story. Leon Uris's beloved Irish classic, available in Avon mass market. From the acclaimed author who enthralled the world with Exodus, Battle Cry, QB VII, Topaz .


Leon Uris Trinity Ebook

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Leon Marcus Uris (August 3, – June 21, ) was an United States Marine and His two bestselling books were Exodus (published in ) and Trinity. Leon Uris has painted a masterful portrait of a beleaguered people divided by religion and wealth--impoverished Catholic peasants pitted against a Protestant. Preview and download books by Leon Uris, including Exodus, Redemption and many more. Audiobooks. See All · Trinity (Unabridged).

The "terrible beauty" that is Ireland comes alive in this mighty epic that re-creates that Emerald's Isle's fierce struggle for independence.

Trinity is a saga of glories and defeats, triumphs and tragedies, lived by a young Catholic rebel and the beautiful and valiant Protestant girl who defied her heritage to join him. Leon Uris has painted a masterful portrait of a beleaguered people divided by religion and wealth--impoverished Catholic peasants pitted against a Protestant aristocracy wielding power over life and death. Download ebook for print-disabled. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with:. Copy and paste this code into your Wikipedia page.

Need help? Last edited by ImportBot. September 6, History. Add another edition? Trinity Leon Uris. This is so depressing. OK, maybe I am suppose to feel the horror so I can accept how some of the Irish have resorted to terrorism and violence. And the humor in thiz book is only sarcastic; there is no joy visible ever in these poor people's lives.

Throgugh page What is happening is simply horrible. I ought to care more. I don't know whose fault that is - the author's or mine! But we all know what has happened to the Irish people is horrendous. If you like a good, long epic story about a family I recommend this book.

I have no trouble understanding why lots of people like it. Escape into that family and time and place. But I find it rather predictable.

OK, fine,that happened. I don't really care terribly much.

It is simply a GOOD story. Somehow that isn't enough for me. Since the death of Father Lynch, Father Cluny had been receiving a great number of retroactive confessions. Some were more serious than this, some were better.

He was thinking in terms of declaring a general amnesty rather than have half the parish serve penance. Their crops might rot what with all that praying. I AM learning Irish history. I DO like some of the characters. Here is another book where the antics of the church make me happy I am NOT religious. BUT, when you start looking at how many pages you have read and how many are left AND when I keep going back to GR to check out other books rather than reading this - well then there is something wrong.

It is a good story, but I am simply not emotionally engaged. I wouldn't say the characters are terribly nuanced.

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Some, partucularly Caroline Weed, are amusing. She is so outspoken. The relationship between her and her father is as direct as it could be. Would a daughter act as she acts in the s? I think it is possible, although not usual. It IS amusing. On a completely different issue, that of how the British viewed the Irish, I cannot help but make a comparison to how, today, the Jews in Israel look upon the Palestinians. Both the British and the Israelites see the indigenous people as being lazy, good-for-nothing scoundrels.

They feel they have brought prgress and knowledge to the uncultivated, uneducated and lazy people from whom they took their land. Of course I am generalizing here; not every one behaves so badly.

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I personally have heard this view from a woman I know currently living in Israel, so the comparison just smacked me in the face. I had mixed feelings when I started this book. First of all I HAD to read it and that is not a good way to start a book. I am getting into the book, and I am enjoying it. It follows two struggling Catholic families living in the small village Ballyutogue situated on Lough Foyle in Ulster.

You learn about the family ancestors and their role in Northern Ireland's history starting at the beginning of the 19th century. The reader clearly understands the antagonism between the Scotts who were Presbyterian, the Irish Catholics and the ruling English Anglicans. The Scotts were kicked out of England and came to get a better life in Ireland, but there they never had the high status of the English. The English encouraged the Catholics and Scotts to see each other as enemies.

The winner was of course the English. Then the potatoe famine of the s brought terrible suffering to the peasants, both the Catholics and the Presbyterians.

Uris does a vey good job of allowing the reader to understand the horror of the potatoe famine. It is September and all the stored potatoes turn black. This is the peasants ONLY source of food through the coming winter and how could next year's crop be owed if all was destroyed.

These people had nothing to begin with and then also no food. How do you feed your children. Can you imagine the horror? Then of course those who should help don't.

This is a scenario we see that continues today. The history is clear. Some may say it is black and white, but this is a general description of what happened. Obviously some Englsih did try and help, but they were in any case few and far between, and not enough to turn the tide of disaster. On another issue, you learn alot about Irish customs, superstitions and village life. The wake at a funeral was fun to read about - the importance of spirits and fairies, the partying and lamenting are all rolled together.

Another plus are the wonderful maps all throughout the book.

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Xmas present from my Mom who is Scotch - Irish. She says that is where we got our tempers from. View all 9 comments. Sectarian violence in Ireland before partition. Like any so-called terrorist activity, it ended up with there being little to choose between the protagonists but the origin of this one was certainly down to the British, in the first place, and the Protestants in the second - and mainly down to the brutal treatment of the Catholic Irish during the potato famines.

We think it's all over now; but sectarian hate takes a long time to fade. Jun 03, Heather Lindsay rated it it was amazing.

I loved this book - I had to finish it by checking it out of the library because my particular edition was missing about pages in the middle of the novel. I can't say enough good things about this book. What I learned in public school and on the news about the conflict between Catholics and Protestants in Ireland was spare and more from the Protestant's perspective.

Reading this book gave me a rich context for understanding the issues from the Catholic's perspective. Although it is fiction, I loved this book - I had to finish it by checking it out of the library because my particular edition was missing about pages in the middle of the novel.

Although it is fiction, historical events, laws, policies, and figures from William of Orange and Oliver Cromwell to Winston Churchill are part of the novel. Uris manages to develop so many characters, even those who make brutal decisions with devastating consequences. Some I wanted to hate but I did not because of Uris' approach to developing those characters. Because the novel spans many years and tells the history of Ireland's struggle for Home Rule from many perspectives, it is simply brilliant.

Although it is tragic in many ways, and I don't know that Uris intended this, the novel is uplifting and hopeful - how people can gather their strength to fight a battle that will result in a defeat simply to make that defeat glorious and inspiring so others will fight too -that to me is the power the dream of freedom carries for the individual. The themes of this book connect to every culture that has ever been colonized, demonized by its colonizer, and devastated by disease, loss of cultural heritage, and loss of family.

Jan 24, Melanie rated it really liked it. This book was incredibly eye opening, heart wrenching and inspring for me to read as I learned more about the tragic history of Ireland. The author did amazing amounts of research for this book and tried to portray accuracy in what life was like and what was going on there in the late s and early s. It was a fascinating, depressing, moving and very thought provoking book for me.

I have to give a HUGE warning about the language though! I only read this because my Dad loved it and still ta This book was incredibly eye opening, heart wrenching and inspring for me to read as I learned more about the tragic history of Ireland.

I only read this because my Dad loved it and still talks about it all the time I think mostly because the main character is Conor and I have a son Connor I think he read it so long ago that he forgot about the language issue. Anyway, I am glad I read this book--but I wouldn't read it again due to the bad language.

But--what I loved most about the book besides learning more about Ireland was the main character Conor Larkin.

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Wow--what a man! I can see why my Dad loves this book so much! He was completly committed to something bigger than himself--freedom for his people He was extremely passionate, courageous, strong, fierce and determined to this worthy and pratically hopeless at the time cause.

I was very inspired by this character to live more passionatly,and purposefully in standing up for what I believe in and cherish. I now feel so much compassion and empathy for the people of Ireland. There was so much suffering for so long there. I would love to travel to Ireland one day and see the "terrible beauty" for myself! This isn't just a book of historical fiction, it really is quite good literature as well.

Parallel's for analyzing abound, and feel a second reading would do it justice but at nearly pages I don't know.. I would even say it belong's in required reading in any Irish Lit class.

The story catapult's the reader into the lives of the Irish from mid's to the "We are all absurd actors on the stage of the diabolical. The story catapult's the reader into the lives of the Irish from mid's to the Eve of the Easter Rising. It's a good primer of Irish history but only offers the briefest sketch of earlier history enough only to set the stage for the birth of the Irish Republican Brotherhood.

The characters are brilliantly multi-faceted and shimmer from the pages. A reader will come away from the book looking at the Irish surnames walking around in abundance in a whole new light. Honestly, you will look at the face of the one who carries the name and know, something maybe even they don't know themselves However, the more I learn the more I see how the Irish diaspora colored the world beautiful.

When I was in the tenth grade, my favorite teacher of all time gave us the assignment to read four books by one of his six favorite authors.

I chose Leon Uris. If I could date a fictional character, he would--hands down--be the fictional When I was in the tenth grade, my favorite teacher of all time gave us the assignment to read four books by one of his six favorite authors.

If I could date a fictional character, he would--hands down--be the fictional character I'd choose. I also learned a bunch about the potato famine and Ireland's history! It's a big book, yes, but it's worth a read. Excellent historical fiction about Ireland's struggles with England and the fight to declare it's independence. Trinity is based on actual events and takes the reader on a journey throughout Ireland and tells the heartbreaking history of a country that longed to remove itself from the tyrannical rule of the British and Britain's never ending schemes to keep the Irish poor, hungry and so desperate that Irish countrymen and women had no other choice but to flee to other countries, never to return Excellent historical fiction about Ireland's struggles with England and the fight to declare it's independence.

Trinity is based on actual events and takes the reader on a journey throughout Ireland and tells the heartbreaking history of a country that longed to remove itself from the tyrannical rule of the British and Britain's never ending schemes to keep the Irish poor, hungry and so desperate that Irish countrymen and women had no other choice but to flee to other countries, never to return to their beloved Ireland again. If you love Ireland, you will love Trinity.

There is also a sequel to Trinity. Mar 14, Laura rated it it was amazing Recommended to Laura by: Jean Harrington. A masterpiece on Irish story, telling the saga of Conor Larkin, showing his principle of non-recognition of British institutions on Irish soil and disobedience to British authority became a universally accepted cornerstone for breaking the yoke of the colonizer.

Aug 09, Gary rated it really liked it. The most wonderful thing about Leon Uris' books are his testament to the eternal indomitable strength of the human spirit.

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This novel explores the agony and struggles of Ireland through the story of a fictional Irish fighter, Conor Larkin. The book begins with the deth of Kilty Larkin, the father of Tomas, and grandfather of Conor. It captures the sights, sounds , smell and experiences of Iralnd in 19th century Ireland through the eyes of Conor's childhood friend Seamus.

Conor is visited by a sh The most wonderful thing about Leon Uris' books are his testament to the eternal indomitable strength of the human spirit. Conor is visited by a shanachie type of Irish spirit of a n Irish storyteller who has experienced the early rebellions of the 19th century and the potato famine. This sets him off on the path of Irish revolution against British rule.

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He grows up to become a master craftsman, rugby player, poet and eventually revolutionary and gun runer. The book is filled with good and evil characters: The aristocratic British overlords the Hubbles and sir Frederick Weed who plays the Orange Card to strengthen British rule over Ireland and the great profits to be made out of the country, As such the book explores the horror of the poverty and exploitation suffered at the time by the Irish people.

I fell in love with the beautiful and valiant lover of Conor's the working class Protestant Shelley McLeod, who joins herself body and soul to Conor and his cause. The only real downside to the book is the way all Protestant Loyalists are depicted as villainous and the bias towards the Catholic and Republican side.

When the truth is there have been wrongs and rights on both sides of this conflicts, atrocities commited by all and tragedies suffered by all. Nevertheless this epic is exciting,illuminating,sad,humorous, brutal and picturesque. Sep 13, LemonLinda rated it really liked it. I was captivated by many of the characters and immersed in the unfolding historical overview.

The Larkins, especially Connor, represent the Catholic poor who are basically fighting for survival and fighting against the many injustices forced upon them. The MacLeods represent the Protestant workers who cling to their Scottish heritage and wear the Orange proudly.

These three groups are destined to love, to hate, to use each other and finally to clash in ways that could destroy them all.

What kept it from being a 5 star for me was that it was so heavily skewed to good guys on one side and bad guys on the other. Yes, in this case, I do believe that the British landowners in large part kept the native Irish broken and downtrodden in an effort to maintain their position and power, however, in reality it is rarely that simple and that clear cut. I do, however, think that this novel clearly outlines the enmity and hostility between the classes and the religion differences that spilled over into open and hostile conflict finally resulting in the Home Rule for Ireland, but only after it split from the northernmost Ulster which was to become Northern Ireland and remain as part of the UK.

May 13, Linda rated it really liked it. Everything I want to say about the book is diametrically opposed to everything I want to say about the book. That is my best description of Ireland in that day.

This book covers the civil unrest in the span of time from the latter 19th century until the second decade of the 20th century. More unrest, such as The Troubles, is yet to be played out in Ireland's history.

The year is a settling down date for much of the strife in Europe and Asia, although the world war would not end until Conor Larkin is an imaginary character that somehow represents the 'everyman' real heroes that we love, hate or have no feeling for at all.

The story could have ended when the central characters were no longer destitute, or when a love interest came to fruition, or after the Sixmilecross plan went awry. It could have ended any number of places if the author had in mind to only write a best seller. That the story was told in whole is indicative of Mr. Uris' dedication to writing history in full.

Thematically, the story was rich. Oppression, discrimination, civil rights and the tenacity of the human spirit are but a few of the themes I found in the book. The book spoke about whiners and losers and people of true grit. The author made me think about different ethnic groups and how their stories stack up against the history of the Irish who longed for, fought for and died for freedoms fundamental to the very core of who they were.

View all 5 comments. I am in fact oscillating between 4 and 5 stars.

I think the book is indeed an amazing story, well written and documented [as far as I read], with lots of suspence and critical points. It made me cry and smile, be outraged and overwhelmed, hopeless and then hopeful. What I didn't enjoy so much were the seemingly isolated parts of industrial details, but I guess if I had more patience and interest I'd have seen their proper integration in the plot and overall image.

Just like in Exodus, there are s I am in fact oscillating between 4 and 5 stars. Just like in Exodus, there are several strong characters, outstanding, brilliant, and I'm wondering now if it's an Uris characteristic or not I was abhorred and disgusted by the manipulation done by the church, both Catholic and Protestant, but at the point when I thought I could go no further, there were examples that brought light and grace into the picture.

I also liked the concept of different callings, ideas and ideals, and the diversity of human nature portrayed with weaknesses and strengths, and their sometimes conflicting concept of right and just. I liked the idea of a person's spark pg. I must mention I started enjoying the book after the first pages, when the general gloom started wearing off a little.

Unavailable for download. Continue shopping Checkout Continue shopping. Sort By: Exodus by Leon Uris This 1 New York Times international bestseller tells the epic history of Israel's birth through the eyes of two generations of Jews as they fight to reclaim their homeland.

Leon Uris tactfully meshes together the story of two 19th century Jewish brothers who seek refuge in Palestine with the 20th century story of how Israel gained its independence after World War II. Rich in historical accuracy Read more Meanwhile, Soviet forces blockade Germany in a bid for power, and the Western Allies must Redemption Epic Story of Trinity Continues A dramatic saga set against the backdrop of growing unrest in Ireland and a world on the brink of the First World War,Redemption weaves together a cast of unforgettable characters that Now, after rebuilding his name in a British colony and being knighted by the British monarchy, Kelno finally feels safe returning to London.

But his past O'Hara's Choice by Leon Uris Fifty years after his first novel, Battle Cry, took the world by storm, Leon Uris returns to the topic that first inspired him to write books that captivate, educate, and thrill -- the Marine Corps. In the years following the Civil War, first-generation Irish-American Zachary O'Hara, son of a legendary Marine and a force of a man in his own right, finds himself playing a critical role in the very Read more 7.

But Quinn is a man with an explosive secret that can shatter his political amibitions, threaten his life, and tear theIt makes for a fair airplane read, but not much else. At times, I could hear the lilt of an Irish brogue in his writing. Well, I disagree with all of those site acolytes. Prefer the physical book? Other Editions Read more The aristocratic British overlords the Hubbles and sir Frederick Weed who plays the Orange Card to strengthen British rule over Ireland and the great profits to be made out of the country, As such the book explores the horror of the poverty and exploitation suffered at the time by the Irish people.

Since the death of Father Lynch, Father Cluny had been receiving a great number of retroactive confessions. Written in English.

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