LADY IN WHITE BOOK

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The Woman in White is Wilkie Collins' fifth published novel, written in It is considered to . Harper's Weekly (USA). It was published in book form in The Woman in White book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. 'In one moment, every drop of blood in my body was brought to. raudone.info - download The Woman in White (Bantam Classics) book online at best prices in India on raudone.info Read The Woman in White (Bantam Classics) book .


Lady In White Book

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raudone.info - download The Woman in White (Collins Classics) book online at best prices in India on raudone.info Read The Woman in White (Collins Classics) book . Generally considered the first English sensation novel, The Woman in White features the remarkable heroine Marian Halcombe earn your way to a free book!. The Woman in White (Bantam Classics) [Wilkie Collins] on raudone.info The Woman in White and millions of other books are available for instant access.

The letter tells Laura to stay away from Sir Percival—he's a creep. Sir Percival also makes some shifty legal demands regarding Laura's inheritance, which the family lawyer doesn't like. Laura hems and haws about everything but finally decides to marry Sir Percival anyway, since she promised her dad she would. Marian is less than pleased with the situation. Flash-forward to after the wedding. Laura and Sir Percival return from their honeymoon, and Marian comes to live with them at Sir Percival's mansion, Blackwater Park sounds cheery.

Things go from bad to worse for the sisters as they are forced to square off against the greedy and crafty Fosco and Percival, both of whom are out for Laura's money. After a tense few weeks, Marian falls dangerously ill after spying on Fosco and Percival in the rain.

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Should've brought that umbrella, Marian. The two men conspire to get Laura out of the house. Except not. Collins was a mere artisan. He is a man prepared to plot actual murder to retain his hold on the cash and also to keep his own desperate secret secure. The intricacies of the plot, however, defy easy summary, each convolution and partial revelation driving the reader on to the next scene, and the next, disclosing the secret like a series of Russian dolls.

It was said that the eminent politician William Gladstone once cancelled an evening appointment to finish a Collins novel. This is a common reader experience. Everything develops from one of the most famous scenes in Victorian literature: She acts as a powerful cipher.

Usage terms Public Domain Gothic romance in modern dress Collins used all the apparatus of the Gothic romance in modern dress. The castle becomes the oppressive country house Blackwater with its decaying wings and oppressive lake. The dungeon is transformed into a lunatic asylum or domestic servitude in marriage. The monstrous Machiavellian lord becomes the evil genius, Count Fosco. Significantly, the dark forest outside the laws of civilisation becomes London, the bewildering, labyrinthine metropolis.

Collins also explores one of the key themes of Gothic fiction — that the world goes awry when paternal authority is weak, perverted or absent. Fathers and husbands — other than the aptly named Hartright — are conniving, irresponsible or dastardly in The Woman in White. Wilkie Collins begins with an atmospheric mystery that is exciting and almost haunting. I really wanted to know all the secrets the story had to offer. So even when the book began to grow a little dull around the middle I carried on reading because I hoped that the dryness would be worth it, my patience was bound to be rewarded.

I was so terribly mistaken. The big reveal a The Woman in White promises so much and delivers very little. The big reveal at the end is so ridiculously anti-climactic that I actually laughed. For a book like this, one that is driven by the plot rather than the characters, it is such a major downfall.

The real problem this story had is its pacing.

There is simply too much middle where the story just doesn't go anywhere and the characters fret over the same facts but get no closer to understanding what any of it means. I grew bored of the endless speculation and marriage politics. I wanted something to happen beyond the seemingly endless conversation that held no substance. And the entire situation was agony. It was just so frustrating! It simply did not need to happen whatsoever and was predictable to a fault.

Wake up! Look at the real world! Surely, surely, nobody would be that stupid? I gave up caring. It was a relief to finish. View all 9 comments. The settings are spooky; the motives of characters, although well known from the very start and from the intense descriptions throughout, still manage to surprise. All the elements I adore are here. No matter that bad guys get what they deserve in the end And the pacing is exactly what a serial novel of this magnitude would require it to endure.

I kept at it Lucky short-living Londoners. View all 8 comments. View all 4 comments. A buddy read on the side with the Non-crunchers — hold the pants.

This book is over years old, but, still, spoilers be us. This book has a lot going for it — a well-wrought plot, humor, some of literatures more enduring characters Marian, Fosco, crazy Uncle Frederick , but it could have been cut down by a third and been one fine-tuned literary machine.

I understand the book was serialized and that Wilkie Collins was probably being paid a tuppence-per-word A buddy read on the side with the Non-crunchers — hold the pants. I understand the book was serialized and that Wilkie Collins was probably being paid a tuppence-per-word and was best buds with the great Charles Dickens, who was a prodigious author in his own write heh! This book was written as a series of first person entries by a number of characters and divided into three epochs. So he runs away to Central America where he sends her lots of sketches of what looks like a Honduran anaconda jumping out of a bush.

Plus, she apologizes for being a woman in Victorian society about 1. View all 98 comments. What took me so long to read this wonderful suspenseful and well written classic? I rarely read mysteries and I was really surprised to find that a book first published in could be so chilling and mysterious and be as fresh and exciting today as it was in I started reading the book as part of a group read and the idea was to read the novel as it was originally published in weekly serial format and while I did try to stick with the rules I am afraid my curiosity and willpower got the b What took me so long to read this wonderful suspenseful and well written classic?

I rarely read mysteries and I was really surprised to find that a book first published in could be so chilling and mysterious and be as fresh and exciting today as it was in I started reading the book as part of a group read and the idea was to read the novel as it was originally published in weekly serial format and while I did try to stick with the rules I am afraid my curiosity and willpower got the better of me and I just could not put down this compelling and extremely well written mystery.

So my apologies to the group for not sticking with the format of reading but grateful for the push to read a book that I might otherwise have missed out on. Manor Houses, ghostly figures by gravesides, mysterious letters and asylums and devious characters are what make this such a compelling read.

The story is narrated by several different characters, all portraying their their own experiences. The book is just under pages and is quite a read and yet the pacing and plot development is extremely well thought out.

I downloaded the book on my site but was informed by a friend that there existed an absolutely amazing audio version narrated by Josephine Bailey and Simon Prebble and while I was skeptical that my interest could be sustained for over 25 hours decided to download the Audio as well and was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed the production and the fact that I was able to read and listen really added to the the overall enjoyment of this book.

My only regret is my lack of discipline to read this one over the period of weeks as per the reading groups instructions. A great book for readers who enjoy classics or Victorian mysteries with terrific plot lines with well developed characters and a little romance with good old fashioned twists and turns.

View all 31 comments. May 22, Paul Bryant rated it liked it Shelves: I retired to my room, not before kissing my dearest darling Marian, and lay down upon my sofa for five hours. What a day! In the evening I played upon the piano, a quite difficult piece, which caused me to have to retire early and sleep for eighteen hours, once my maid Fannie undressed me and stroked my eyebrows.

Usually Fannie from excess of sentimental attachment will gently rain down white rose petals upon my counterpaine as I fall asleep to infuse my dreams with sweetness. Alas she could not do that this evening as she was required to assist the scullery undermaid in clearing the waterpond of poisonous snails, so I slept but fitfully.

Marian joined me as usual. A man smiled at me and I became very ill. As is universally understood, women are irrational creatures much given to frivolous whim and it is a situation earnestly to be desired that they be closely commanded by their menfolk, who at all times understand their best interests better than they themselves.

I believe Sir Percival is trying to kill me, but that, as I have intimated, is his prerogative. I may mention that Sir Percival is the husband of my half-sister sweet kind innocent trusting pure lovely slenderwaisted Laura.

A man may beat a dog to tame it, and that is only just. Sometimes, I confess, I dare to think that a woman is better than a dog in the eyes of Our Maker. The scullery undermaid has died from something, I know not what. It is the only joy left to me that I should be allowed each night to clasp to my bosom this divine creature my half sister Laura and sleep with her in my arms which can and on occasion does produce a cramp in both arms that will not dissipate all the following morning however vigorously I swing my limbs around.

The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

But I say a cheap price to pay for such infinitude of bliss. I am of a different opinion as I have detected that they were shot five and forty minutes apart.

There can surely not have been two identical accidents whilst cleaning pistols on one morning. I simply cannot believe it.

I believe Sir Percival wishes to shut us up in an asylum. As we look exactly like two existing patients in a private asylum in north London, this will probably happen on Tuesday of next week. My husband addressed me in these terms: Make your meaning plain.

Why, I — I am the omelette! View all 24 comments. The woman in white, Wilkie Collins, First Published 'In one moment, every drop of blood in my body was brought to a stop Engaged as a drawing master to the beautiful Laura Fairlie, Walter becomes embroiled in the sinister intrigues of Sir Percival Glyde and his ' The woman in white, Wilkie Collins, First Published 'In one moment, every drop of blood in my body was brought to a stop Pursuing questions of identity and insanity along the paths and corridors of English country houses and the madhouse, The Woman in White is the first and most influential of the Victorian genre that combined Gothic horror with pyschological realism.

View all 3 comments. Jan 11, TJ rated it really liked it Shelves: This book is an amazing teaching tool. Not because it conveys any great lessons in life or exhibits profound understanding and insight but because it so clearly delineates the beauty and differences in 19th century writing and 21st century writing. The story is definitely very gothic and one of the best mysteries available. It is in the length of the story - most especially the length of the writing that will probably cause many readers to balk.

The descriptions, the conversations, the ideas Reading this in today's society, where TV, the internet, pictures, videos etc.

In order to truly appreciate Collins writing, one must put themselves in the shoes of a reader amid 19th century standards. Most people knew little of life outside their small communities. Few traveled or had experience with people and places beyond the immediate. Thus the need for long explanations and descriptions. It was the only door open for a reader to experience life beyond. A perfect example would be the description of Count Fosco, a very large Italian man.

His description was so intricate and detailed as to take pages not paragraphs - pages. To us, that description might seem never-ending. To one who had probably never seen, let alone known an Italian man - good or bad - it described one so perfectly that the reader without our modern day photography could picture him with ease.

Therefore, any accurate review of this book must allow for those differences. Readers who enjoy the beauty of the written word just for itself will absolutely revel in this story. Those who are more story driven will need to put on their patience caps to get through it.

The story itself is immaculately well-done, it is dark without being terrifying, riveting without being graphic. It is just couched within a style long forgotten and truly appreciated.

View all 21 comments. Nov 11, Arah-Lynda rated it it was amazing Shelves: Originally published in a weekly periodical between late and as a serial story, this is believed to be the first English crime detection novel. This is Victorian fiction that combines romance, mystery and Gothic horror with a psychological twist.

The story opens with an eerie encounter, in the dead of night on a moonlit London road. In one moment, every drop of blood in my body was brought to a stop… There, as if it had that moment sprung out of the earth…stood the figure of a solitary w Originally published in a weekly periodical between late and as a serial story, this is believed to be the first English crime detection novel.

In one moment, every drop of blood in my body was brought to a stop… There, as if it had that moment sprung out of the earth…stood the figure of a solitary woman, dressed from head to foot in white.

Collins had me at hello. I loved the fly on the wall perspective of events as revealed through a series of narrators, starting with Walter Hartright, drawing master of the time and place, who introduced me to Marian Halcombe thusly; The instant my eyes rested on her, I was struck by the rare beauty of her form, and by the unaffected grace of her attitude. She had not heard my entrance into the room; and I allowed myself the luxury of admiring her for a few moments, before I moved one of the chairs near me, as the least embarrassing means of attracting her attention.

She turned towards me immediately. The easy elegance of every movement of her limbs and body as soon as she began to advance from the far end of the room, set me in a flutter of expectation to see her face clearly. She left the window — and I said to myself, The lady is dark.

She moved forward a few steps — and I said to myself, The lady is young. She approached nearer — and I said to myself with a sense of surprise which words fail me to express , The lady is ugly! Marian knows who she is, personally and as a woman in Victorian society.

Never have I been so invested in a character. I adore and applaud her. She is simply one of the most deftly drawn, beautiful and complex renderings I have ever encountered in the written word.

Without a doubt it is Collins characters that both support and propel this story, each in their own unique voice, of which Marian is but one. All brilliantly drawn and cleverly revealed as time goes by. It is a classic, therefore it is wordy, with long drawn out, highly descriptive sentences that go on and on and on as they slowly, persistently tug you forward.

Excerpt: 'The Woman in White'

No matter! I lapped up every word. View all 23 comments. Son pocos los autores que pueden darse el lujo de lograr lo que Collins genera en sus novelas.

La trama argumental de la novela es clara y aparentemente simple: Solo se interpone en su camino una misteriosa dama vestida de blanco que, al parecer, ha escapado de un sanatorio mental Marian Halcombe. View all 14 comments. Nov 04, Evgeny rated it liked it Shelves: A group read with a bunch of Pantaloonless Buddies.

A young painter Walter Hartright unexpectedly received a good job offer. On his way home from his mother place he encountered a mysterious woman dressed in white walking alone who asked him for directions - in the middle of the night and in the middle of nowhere, mind you. The guy though that he would never see her again especially in his new place of employment where he taught a young woman painting.

He fell in love with her - way beyond his so A group read with a bunch of Pantaloonless Buddies. He fell in love with her - way beyond his social standing. It does not help much that her late father had a wish of her marring his friend. The latter has a very dark secret known to the Woman in White.

We came full circle. From the very beginning I have to say that it was entirely my fault I only rated the book with 3 stars.

I expected a mystery similar to Moonstone written by the same author. Instead I found it to be a drama with some elements of mystery, horror, and Gothic. On the positive side the book is quite easy to read for a Victorian novel. The villains were unexpectedly flashed out with some good sides in them and I found one of them to be the best character overall.

On the negative side Wilkie Collins is not exactly get-to-the-point kind of guy. The novel could be easily trimmed by one third at least without losing anything at all.

I have yet to see another equally useless character - male or female - in the literature; she has not done anything even remotely meaningful in the full length of the novel. According to Darwin's Evolution Theory she simply should not have survived.

In conclusion I would like to stress again that this is not a bad book, but not what I expected from it. I like Moonstone which I mentioned above much more. View all 16 comments. Newest review: This was a reread and I enjoyed it immensely. First review: This was a really amazing book that takes you on such a journey! I started it four days ago, and now - after having finished it - I feel like I've returned back home safely after having been gone for a long time.

I don't know if that makes much sense, but that's how I feel: Now, this was my first book by Wilkie Collins and all I Newest review: Now, this was my first book by Wilkie Collins and all I knew was that it was supposed to be a Victorian, scary read. It was in the beginning, and also slightly in the middle, but I was sad to realize towards the end that this turned more into a detective novel.

I'm not fond of detective novels, and therefore that slightly decreased my reading experience and my fondness of this book. That being said, I loved how this book is constructed through diverse narratives that are all pieces in a big puzzle.

The narratives allowed for me to connect with the characters on an intimate level, and the characters were simply amazing! They stuck to my mind and followed me around when I wasn't reading, and I think that they are the best part of this story.

The Woman in White

Even though I did find some of the things happening too convenient for my taste, I can't neglect the fact that this is a beautifully crafted piece of work that leaves an impression on you.

I was contemplating between 3 and 4 stars while reading, so in the end I decided to go for 3. I loved the book despite its weaknesses, I just would've hoped for more Victorian eeriness and less of a detective novel. View 2 comments. This is one of the greatest books I have read in my life.

It is really amazing that how many great books I have come across and read this year, all thanks to goodreads. Although his prose is a little long winding, he nevertheless has well managed to k This is one of the greatest books I have read in my life. There is also a cinematic quality to his writing.

Normally when I read a book, it engages with my own mental interpretations as I read along. But reading experience of this book was so different; not at any point Collins allowed my own mental interpretations to come in to light.

He held them tight to his story and convincingly too, that I was unable to wander on my own. This phrase from the preamble sets the pace for the story justifying the use of number of narrators to tell it — their reliability varying in degree. This is yet another new experience for me, hearing the story from so many different narrators.

And I felt it is a refreshing method to have the story told through different persons, given the length of the book. This served two purposes; one was avoiding the reader being bored of the story and the other is to avoid it being biased.

There were a hero and heroine in the characters of Walter Hartright and Marian Halcombe. I was with them through every step of the way of their difficult and dangerous journey collecting the necessary evidence to bring justice to a wronged woman. I also liked the character of the Laura, the young innocent victim, who bore such vile cruelty with a calm resolution of her own. Then there are the villains: Sir Percival Glyde — an epitome of brutality and Count Fosco — the most sinister character that I have thus far come across with his cold, calculating and brilliant brain.

All these dark and dear characters contributed to the plot of the story to make it one of the best classic stories I have ever read.

The book which is a pioneer in sensational novel was a great success in its time and I believe still is which in itself accounts for its greatness. Simply, I loved the book and it was a great read. View all 15 comments. Oct 20, Megan Baxter rated it really liked it. The Woman in White is a gem of a novel - creepy, dense, menacing, and always intriguing. For a long time, the reader isn't quite sure what is going on, only that it isn't good - and it's to Collins' credit that when the plots are revealed, they are as interesting as anything I was supposing.

The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at The Woman in White is a gem of a novel - creepy, dense, menacing, and always intriguing. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook View all 13 comments. The Woman in White is an extraordinary book. It captivated the reading public of the time, and in parts is almost as breathlessly mesmerising and gripping to read now.

When it was first published, it wowed the reading public, and manufacturers got on the ban The Woman in White is an extraordinary book.

It can truly be said that this novel was a sensation. No longer would gruesome and spectacular crimes only happen in fantastic Medieval castles, but behind the doors of ordinary domestic environments. Virtuous women would still be menaced by dastardly cads, but the element of realism was key. And to top all this, The Woman in White is also considered to be among the first mystery novels.

Yet in , at the time of publication, Wilkie Collins was still very much in the shadow of Charles Dickens. Back in April , the twenty-seven year old Wilkie Collins had already turned his back on convention. His father wanted him to become a clergyman, but after some agonising, Wilkie Collins went a different way, and trained to become a barrister. He completed his legal studies and was called to the bar in , but never formally practised, instead deciding to become a writer.

Dickens, then forty years of age, was by now a literary phenomenon, with his fingers in lots of pies. Although Dickens himself earned over a thousand pounds per annum from his work on the magazine, Wilkie Collins was initially paid by the column. Four years later, in September , he finally became a staff writer who would be paid the standard rate of five guineas per week. For Victorian readers, to read a novel in serial form was the norm, and quite a few of these serials have since become classic novels.

Sales immediately increased! What a treasure trove these Victorian readers had in their magazines! Both novels are thrilling even now, with a strong story line, gothic feel and complex plot. Both dealt with secrets, past and present, questions and doubts about identity and social position.

Both made use of the ideas of suspect wills, forged documents, inheritances, secret marriages, and illegitimacy; themes very much in flux in the changing society in the Victorian era. What makes these novels so appealing to us now is that they are both exciting page-turners, with suspenseful mystery at their heart, and twists a-plenty.

The Woman in White is a complex tale, with an unusual narrative structure. It is told by several narrators, and different forms, either as reported action, or diaries, or letters.

In a way it resembles an epistolary novel, as each narrator has a distinct narrative voice. We begin to wonder who is to be trusted, and who might be an unreliable narrator. We also see how some characters are vague, or naive, others are driven and passionate, yet others again are vain, or dissembling.

Wilkie Collins is very much in the driving seat throughout this novel, carefully rationing out little pieces of the jigsaw, and disclosing the secret like a series of Russian dolls. He also manipulates our feelings, controlling who we think we trust. The entire novel is deviously plotted. Oddly though, reading in the novel form we now have available, this is not as evident. The narratives varied in length from one page to, surprisingly, two hundred.

Some are divided into parts, and sometimes an installment contained parts of one and part of another. One narrator even returns later. The only choice was to have a completely new structure for the novel itself: The chapter names are also slightly different, for instance this magnificent original narrative title: Count of the Holy Roman Empire. Perpetual Archmaster of the Rosicrucian Masons of Mesopotamia. These details so reminiscent of Dickens are sadly lost in most modern editions.

Also, the suspense of the former endings of each installment are also lost, or rather subsumed into part of the action, but the whole flows just as well, and is just as addictive.

Wilkie Collins clearly understood people very well. He has created a wealth of wonderful characters.

There is the faithful and angelic Laura Fairlie, view spoiler [ entrapped by hide spoiler ] the sinister, secretive Percival Glyde; there is her impossible uncle, the effete connoisseur of the Arts, Frederick Fairlee, source of much of the humour in this book, with his monumental selfishness and exaggerated hypochondria.

There is of course the wonderful Count Fosco, charismatic and cunning, with his cockatoo, his canary-birds, and his pet white mice, who run over his immense body, partnered by his overly dutiful, malevolently vindictive wife. Another is the intelligent, and resourceful Marian Halcombe, one of his most powerful creations.

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Some consider that with this mannish, eloquent character, Collins was attempting to create a positive portrayal of a lesbian woman, within the constraints of the time. Collins attacked middle-class hypocrisy, perhaps because he was himself so bohemian. Outwardly, he was a member of the Establishment. Wilkie Collins lived respectably enough with his mother for many years, whilst setting up his mistress, Caroline Graves, in a house nearby. Charles Dickens too, was very much the family man in public.

In fact although he and Collins both professed to be Christians, they had extraordinary lifestyles, and their views of marriage were very different from each other, for such close friends. She had married young, had a child, and been widowed. Wilkie Collins treated Harriet, whom he called Carrie, as his own daughter, and helped to pay for her education.

The two stayed together for most of their lives although he refused to marry her as he disliked the institution of marriage. Extraordinarily for the time, Wilkie Collins also had another mistress, the working-class Martha Rudd, by whom he had three children, in a house just a few streets away.I mean, really? This page was last edited on 22 May , at He is--particularly in Marian's grudgingly admiring description--one of the most fascinating and dangerous villains of all mystery fiction.

What a pansy. A group read with a bunch of Pantaloonless Buddies.

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