EBOOK HUNGER GAMES MOCKINGJAY INDONESIA

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Ebook Hunger Games Mockingjay Indonesia

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Kumpulan Ebook Hunger Games Mockingjay Bahasa Indonesia - Berikut ini, kami dari Kumpulan Contoh Skripsi Jurusan Kpi, dari hasil. Mockingjay is a science fiction novel by American author Suzanne Collins. It is the last installment of The Hunger Games, following 's The Hunger. The Hunger Games is a dystopian novel by the American writer Suzanne Collins. . The Hunger Games (and its sequels) have sold exceptionally well in ebook format. The Tim O'Brien-designed cover features a gold "mockingjay" – a fictional bird in The Hunger Games born by crossbreeding female mockingbirds .

When the Gamemakers send a delivery of what each contestant needs most, Katniss risks her life to obtain medicine for Peeta. She is intercepted by a career tribute Clove, who gloats over Rue's death and tries to kill Katniss, but is killed by Thresh, the male District 11 tribute, who spares Katniss for Rue's sake. The medicine saves Peeta's life, and they both spend time hunting and collecting food.

Katniss and Peeta become the last two survivors, but the Gamemakers revoke the rule change to force one to kill the other for a dramatic finale.

In defiance, Katniss prepares to consume the poisonous "nightlock" berries with Peeta. Realizing they intend to commit suicide so that there will not be a victor for the games, the Gamemakers declare Katniss and Peeta the victors. Although both of them receive a hero's welcome as a couple, Katniss is warned by Haymitch that the Capitol may take action against her for her defiance. Along the way back to District 12, Peeta is heartbroken to learn that Katniss' actions were part of a calculated ploy to gain sympathy.

Katniss, however, is unsure of her own feelings and her future. Themes The Hunger Games author Suzanne Collins in In an interview with Collins, it was noted that the novel "tackles issues like severe poverty , starvation, oppression, and the effects of war among others. Katniss needs to hunt to provide food for her family, resulting in the development of skills that are useful to her in the Games such as her proficiency with the bow and arrow , and represents her rejection of the Capitol's rules in the face of life-threatening situations.

The tributes build a personality they want the audience to see throughout the Games. Miller writes: "The rules are arbitrary, unfathomable, and subject to sudden change.

A brutal social hierarchy prevails, with the rich, the good-looking, and the athletic lording their advantages over everyone else. To survive you have to be totally fake. Adults don't seem to understand how high the stakes are; your whole life could be over, and they act like it's just some "phase"!

She should make up her mind about who she wants instead of leading them both on! Her fickleness is pretty inconsiderate to these two guys whom she supposedly cares about. She ended up with Peeta, which would have been fine if it had been executed properly.

She just ended up with Peeta because he was the only one who stuck around. At the end, I found myself wanting her to end up alone, of her OWN choice. Heck, instead of spiraling into bleak depression and continuing life as a puppet, I would have rather seen her die for a noble cause and for doing the right thing.

That would have been a more satisfactory ending, and that's saying something because I normally HATE when characters die. I didn't like that we didn't get to experience the action close-up. As the war unraveled, I felt like Katniss was always on the sidelines, only called in when other people commanded her to.

We didn't get to see Katniss kicking butt against her enemies, we got to hear from other characters about events that occurred, or watch them on the TV. It is so mindnumbingly dull to be watching a character watching something, instead of experiencing the action with the character. Everything she did was for show, for a propo or campaign or whatever.

It was all so.. Here they are in the middle of a war, people are dying left and right, and all they care about is filming and getting good shots and angles and putting on a pretty face! It felt so staged and it was boring and infuriating to read. The only real action is towards the end when she and her team are going on the assassin mission to kill Snow, and even THAT was originally only for a propo that went astray.

The last third of the book the assassin mission was gorey and bloody, which I didn't mind. It's war after all. But many characters' deaths were so rushed and pointless. Prim's death didn't have the impact that I'm sure Collins was aiming for; I didn't feel sad when she died, as she's barely in the story as it is, so I didn't get to know her well enough and connect with her beforehand.

She was absent for at least pages before her death came out of nowhere, for God's sake, so her death felt like any stranger's death. Although it seems her death kind of defeated the point of sparing her from the Hunger Games.

What DID kill me was Finnick's death. Finnick was one of the characters I loved most in this series, and call me petty, but I can't forgive Collins for killing him off after he'd been through so much and finally got to marry the love of his life.

It wasn't even a death of purpose. He got eaten by mutts in a sewer, along with half their assassin team. Deaths are fine when they're important to the plot, but this felt like death for the sake of death.

Okay, now on to the REAL disappointment of this book: Katniss herself. One of the reasons why I loved this series was because of Katniss. She was strong, resourceful, clever and cunning, she had an amazing survival instinct and she knew how to persevere. In Catching Fire, these qualities diminished; she was mainly a pawn, a puppet for others to use for their own objectives.

But she still had some semblance of control and she was still Katniss. In Mockingjay, all these traits are scrapped and we get a Katniss-clone who is angsty and bitchy and whiny wasn't Bella in Twilight bad enough? Half the book, she's throwing herself pity parties in the closet literally! Sure, she definitely has reason to be sad and angry, and her life is full of hardships and tragedies. But I thought that the Katniss from the Hunger Games, the Katniss who had to keep her family alive since the age of 12, would be able to fight through and persevere.

I guess I wanted a strong victor, a strong heroine, not a self-pitying victim who can't make her own decisions.

That's another thing that bothered me: She was a empty, lifeless pawn, a zombie if you will, who didn't do anything that wasn't directed or commanded by other people. I was expecting to see her grow and change and I was excited for her metamorphosis. Instead, we get this weak girl who's shirking all responsibilities, addled on drugs half the time, and lashing out at people the other half.

Not only did she not improve herself from the first book she was kickass in the first book btw , she got WORSE, an empty shadow of her former self. At the beginning, I could understand her confusion, her pain, her reluctance to be the Mockingjay. It'd be weird if she DIDN'T feel this way, if she didn't have that time of indecision and unwillingness. But after, I expected her to be strong and work through it, to face her fears and obstacles and choose to do the right thing, to really fight for justice.

The best things in life never come easy; anybody who's done anything has had to overcome obstacles to accomplish their goals. When she decided: When I heard her inspirational words during the propos, the fire behind them, my heart soared because I thought Katniss was back. But as I kept reading, I realized.. She didn't grow and become stronger, that's what pisses me off. The post-traumatic stress, the mental breakdowns, the self-pity, the self-loathing, the nearing of insanity..

There has to be a turning point when she overcomes all of this and actively decides not to let these obstacles stand in her way. Now, many people will say her breakdown is more true to life, and it's what any normal year-old girl would feel and go through.

I want to read about someone who's a bit special, who's different, who displays traits like courage, heart, perseverance greater than the norm and accomplishes more than the "normal, average teen" even during the most difficult of times. Something that, when you close the book, makes you feel like "Wow, they're amazing. I want to be like that. I came in expecting a break from reality, a fantasy sci-fi young adult novel about a girl who becomes a hero.

In trying to be as realistic as possible, I think Collins chose a pessimistic extreme of "realism" to portray. There are perfectly human people in real life in real circumstances who are able to fight through obstacles and hardships and come out on top without relying on drugs and hiding in closets. They can find more constructive and positive ways to deal with their problems.

Sure, it obviously affects them they're not invincible but they don't lose themselves the way Katniss does. Those are the kinds of inspirational stories I wanna read when it comes to these kinds of novels, not this "Diary of an Emo Puppet. Whenever Collins finally gave us an exciting scene, as soon as it got intense, Katniss would get knocked out in the midst of things and we'd wake up to her in the hospital being treated.

Then, of course, comes the inevitable centuries that's what it felt like of us hearing about her in pain and agony. Now can she please pick herself up and make herself useful? Katniss doesn't deserve the title "girl who was on fire" and to be the main character in such an epic setting and story. Sure, she can be on fire, but only when someone sets her on fire or directs her to be on fire, not of her own doing.

She was soulless and indifferent and cared about herself and her own feelings more than anyone else's seeing as how she spends most of the novel grieving for herself and almost never for anyone else.. What's the point when the main character whose eyes we're seeing through has no heart and no passion? And what happened to the selfless girl who willingly sacrificed her life to save her sister?

The things I did like. I liked that Katniss had 2 seconds of mental clarity and shot Coin instead of Snow the only time in the book when she was truly thinking clearly and acting of her own accord.

I wonder if I'm giving her too much credit though; judging from her selfish one-track mind in this book, I fear that she did this only because Coin killed Prim, not because she saw the bigger picture.

Worse yet, I fear this may just have been a result of Snow's manipulation, not her own decision.

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I also feel the significance and bravery of this smart moment was rendered meaningless by her immediate cowardly reaction: She never once in the book acknowledges all she has to live for and all the positive things she still has in her life.

When a character's will to survive is absent through a whole novel, I as a reader have no desire for them to live either; grant their wish already! But to continue on.. I liked learning about more of the characters in depth: I liked the ending passages fitting and beautifully haunting and I liked the songs The Hanging Tree and the meadow one.

There are probably some other things that I'll update this review with once disappointment and frustration are no longer clouding my brain. I wouldn't have minded so much if it had been a page-turner that was exciting to read, but trying to finish this book felt like a chore. When reading for enjoyment starts feeling like a chore, that's the ultimate sign that I dislike the book.

I kept waiting, I was so sure it would happen any minute, for the story-changing moment when Katniss would pick herself up and say "Enough is enough. This book seriously dragged and dragged and dragged, and just got slower and slower until everyone started dropping dead towards the last quarter of the book. The Hunger Games, I couldn't put it down; for this, I dreaded picking it up to finish it.

I did tons of things in between reading this book doing my nails, watching TV, taking a walk, etc because I couldn't read it in one sitting without wanting to gouge my eyes out.

It was the same reoccurring theme: Katniss was manipulated and controlled by everyone around her and she didn't think or do anything of her own will. It got old. I read all this build-up and didn't get rewarded for it. And even though the rebels triumphed, I didn't feel anything for them, not relief, not happiness, just nothing. I was just detached. And none of it was thanks to Katniss: Again, anti-climactic! During the scene when it really mattered! I understand the message Collins is trying to convey and I agree with it: And good and bad are not clearly defined black and white.

It got too preachy at certain points though, didn't it? And I understand that not all books are unicorns-and-ponies happy endings, and that this series has always been intense and dark and a bit bleak. But that only works when there's an underlying message of hope and of optimism. I felt it in the 1st books, but this ending was devoid of all hope and happiness. Yes, humans are disgusting creatures who hurt and kill one another, who do horrible things because of greed and selfishness and just pure malice.

But humans are also capable of love and compassion and kindness, and I wish she'd incorporated a bit of that into the story as well so there'd be a more hopeful ending.

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Even in real life, no matter how bad things may be, there is always hope. Isn't that the kind of message you really want young people to be left with? Instead of pessimistic doom and "give up on mankind"? I finished the book feeling hopeless and lost and depressed, and not in that deep, profound way where it motivates me to get up off my ass and do something to make a difference. Gosh, at least Harry was his own person and got to face Voldemort in the end.

What did Katniss get to do except be an empty canvas for them to paint and feed lines to? Though I guess since I'm feeling so passionately about all of this, it wasn't a worthless read. It was just very, VERY disappointing. I just re-read this review a month or so after I wrote it and I sincerely apologize for my sloppy writing and overindulgence in run-on sentences! I was in a rush to unleash all my feelings after finishing the book so I wouldn't forget anything.

I hope this review was understandable and enjoyable anyway: That's the end of the review and you can stop here but I wanted to add on.. So I decided to re-read Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to prepare myself for the upcoming movie, and to get the bitter taste of Mockingjay out of my mouth, and here's a passage towards the end where Harry's character really touched me and left me in awe: Sometimes you've got to think about the greater good!

This is war! Don't think I don't know how this might end. I've known it for years. Whatever faults the last HP book may have, I just have to say: Thank you, Harry, for giving me hope again and proving there are still admirable heroes in young literature. View all comments.

Emily Totally agree that the final book of the series is such a disappointment. I personally find the first book most appealing and in logic. Most important Totally agree that the final book of the series is such a disappointment. Most importantly it gave Katniss character same goes for Peeta as warm and thoughtful he is.

The final book is really based on Katniss wandering around until someone calls the shots, which is not what I expected as the character was built so vivid in the first book.

Elise Clark Amen to that 0 minutes ago. Jan 28, Hope rated it it was amazing Shelves: It's good, and yet not good. Katniss is a different person from the first two books. I found her softer, more thoughtful, and also more open granted, she's still kind of a brat sometimes. But don't we all have our moments? This book is filled with more emotion, and I liked her best in this book, even though it's a tragedy of sorts. Something so painful.

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It was a fantastic novel. I don't think I can come up with any better way for a trilogy of this kind to come to a close. The perfect note of sadness and sweetness, pain and healing all mixed up in a jumble. This book was far more severe than the first two. Much harder to read, and with more emotional depth, I think. Sometimes I just had to close the book for a while and breathe because I needed to stop for a bit, to regroup myself so I could get through a certain part.

Collins wove in a few questions to ponder. Where do you draw the line? Do you give just what you got? Is it right to kill innocent people just because the leaders on their side of the line killed innocent people on your side? Contrary to what some believe, this is not an anti-war book. Actually, I think Collins is trying to get us to ask ourselves questions about what justifies war, and where the line should be drawn between justice and vengeance.

Not that we shouldn't fight, but that we know what's worth fighting for. Several notable characters die. The last three pages make all the heavy, intense, painfulness of the rest of the book almost worth it, in a strange way.

Bittersweet is the perfect word. Sometimes we need a little help to pick ourselves off the floor and start again. It left me feeling emotionally drained and like I'd lost something. I'm not sure if I'm shell-shocked or simply worn out by the intensity of it all.

I'm glad, in a way, that it ended like it did. I'm also sad, and a little confused. Not because I didn't like the ending, but because I simply feel emptied out for the time being. I just wish I wish that there could have been more happiness for these characters that I love so much.

I think that unfulfilled wish is, at the end of the day, why I'm feeling this way right now. In time the feeling will pass, I know, but at the moment I'm sorry for it. No matter how I enjoyed this book and I did, I really did , I'm in a sort of grieving state. Happiness was there in the end, but it just wasn't enough to compensate for all the sadness. Then again, I think that was the point. I finished Catching Fire and wanted this in my hands immediately.

Not like uber-happy, of course, I'm not unrealistic I don't care! I'm not making any predictions because it feels like either my wishful thinking or my most dreaded outcome.

I can't find a balance in between. Call me weird. All I can say without bias is that the ending will not be all walkin' in a field of flowers and happiness. Dec 03, Tatiana rated it really liked it Recommends it for: So, of course I had to read it again after getting only half of the story from the Mockingjay movie.

Unsurprisingly, cried and cried again. My feelings basically remain the same about this installment. Structurally, the novel is quite messy. There is such a big game going on and Katniss' motivations and actions don't always make sense to me. But the ending is brilliant, especially the final chapters. I need something to cheer me up ASAP. Let's face it, a series is only as good as its last book. Is a kitchen towel drenched in my tears a good indicator of the quality of Mockingjay? I think it is, considering that I am not a crying-over-books type.

The book is lying next to me now, so deceitful in appearance, with its innocent, bright, cheerful cover. Who knew there would be so much darkness hidden between its pages, so much heartache?

Mockingjay is indeed a DARK, DARK book full of deaths, sacrifices, torture, betrayal and despair, a book which takes you to a very disturbing but very real place. These books are about love indeed, but they are also about survival, freedom, and peace.

I find it amazing that people are disappointed that Katniss doesn't take a Katniss-becomes-a-superwoman-and-takes-over-the-world-while-deciding-on-which-boy-to-pick route. How realistic is it to expect a child damaged by hunger, oppression, and violence she had to witness and take a part in, and thrown into the midst of all kinds of political intrigue, to achieve that?

How many soldiers do you know who came out of a war unscathed or empowered by the atrocities they have witnessed? How many children? This is why this book has such a great effect on me. It takes a very difficult but honest route, portraying the infinitely damaging consequences of war regardless of the righteousness of its cause and Katniss's journey to stay true to herself and do the best she can.

And the love triangle resolution. Truly, it couldn't have ended any other way. Is Mockingjay a perfectly written book?

Absolutely not, it's not nearly as perfectly constructed or clear as The Hunger Games , but just like another imperfectly perfect successful series finale - Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - it brings its message across in the most honest and powerful way possible. Suzanne Collins is a genius, she is fearless and I have a great respect for the gutsiness of hers that didn't allow her to settle for an ending all wrapped up in pink paper with a perfect little bow.

I am sure she knew that the faint of heart would be enraged. But she stuck to her guns and stayed true to her message and to her characters. It will probably take me months and a score of Georgia Nicolson diaries to get over it. But I love this book anyway, in spite and because of all the pain it has caused me. Nov 25, Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies rated it it was ok. Ok, short summary. This is day 3 of my Hunger Games binge after I watched the last movie last Saturday without knowing anything about the books and not having watched any of the movies.

First book. Second book. Third book. And now that we've gotten that over with What the fuck happened to Katniss?! How did she end up being so admirable and awesome in the first two books and turned into such a sniveling, squishy mess in this one?

The answer: What the fuck happened to Peeta? Ok, fine, we know what happened to Peeta, but that doesn't make it any better because he's collateral damage.

And Katniss is the one who gets hurt with her stupid obsession of him. In this book, Gale was my favorite. He's the voice of reason. It's war, people have to die in order for there to be peace. Because I love d? Fuck your single-mindedness, Katniss. And that ending. That stupid ending. I'm sorry, I know that life doesn't always turn out well, but dammit, Suzanne Collins, you put us through the wringer with the last two books.

Feb 11, Annalisa rated it liked it Shelves: I'm not sure how to react to Mockingjay. I didn't love it and I'm not sure it satisfied me, but it was a disturbing read that will stick with me. Not that the series isn't good, but I'm not longer sure it's for the masses of YA readers.

Like Catching Fire , Mockingjay took awhile for me to get into. When the pages turned into the triple digits and I wasn't hooked, I go 3. When the pages turned into the triple digits and I wasn't hooked, I got worried it wouldn't be epic. And maybe that's problem: I expected this to match The Hunger Games when I don't think anything can. Like Catching Fire , the stakes are upped, the gruesomeness of war more real, and the intensity more fierce.

And in the end, that was my biggest problem. In my opinion, this crossed the line with violence into shock value for the sake of shock value.

Yes, it's meant to be thought-provoking and show the price of war to humanity, but at the peak of all this violence, I pulled out of the story. I could see the questions running through her head: What will break her the most? The death that should have hurt most hardly fazed me view spoiler [Primrose hide spoiler ] ; at that point, I had already shut down in a story that was working too hard to manipulate my emotions.

It was view spoiler [Finnick's death hide spoiler ] killed me no pun intended , and it disappeared like a whisper. It seemed like Collins picked the only character she made us care about in this book on purpose.

It should have felt natural to the progression of the story, but it didn't. There is a lot of bleakness in the other books in the series, but it is balanced with a humanity and hope that I think is crucial in YA fiction.

My review of Hunger Games states that Collins took an unbelievable story and made it believable. Here, she took the believable violence and cruelty of war and made it a little unbelievable for me. I struggled to find motivation from President Snow targeting children, to understand why the citizens of the capital continued to believe him, to accept that these villains could be this sadistically evil, to believe that this much could go wrong for one person, to champion Collin's bleak take on humanity.

Not that this story is any more unbelievable than The Hunger Games , but Collins delivered this one with such a numb, detached string of events that relied on violence instead of characters to deliver her message. Even more important than hope in YA is a strong character you would follow anywhere.

I didn't want to follow Katniss in this story. She shut down in the end, but really she'd been shutting down the entire book. After the fiery character of the first two books, it was hard to get nothing from her especially as a first-person POV and still feel vested in the outcome of her story.

Her cold, detached comments to view spoiler [Peeta hide spoiler ] in particular bothered me, especially after everything he sacrificed for her.

I had to keep reminding myself of all the horror she'd been through because although her detachment realistic, it bothered me. I couldn't remember why anyone wanted a self-absorbed teenager as the Mockingjay. I didn't need Katniss to lead the revolution, but I wanted something from her: Without any character development from any of the characters , the story relied too heavily on action without connecting the pieces, developing those story lines, or making me care about the characters involved.

I would have almost rather heard the story from a third party watching a broken Mockingjay than the emptiness with which Katniss tells her story. What I really wanted is Katniss back. I know I can't have her, but if I had to lose her, I wanted to feel heartbreak instead of nothing.

About the love triangle But I was happy with the resolution for these reasons: Gale never showed up in this book, not the intense Gale hiding a painful love for Katniss that I loved. Not once in this book did I feel his love for her. Was comfortable with her, coldly understanding, wanted to win her because it was a competition, but never once did I sense any love. And when he knew the enormous hurdle he had to overcome to win her back, he laughed and walked away.

I would not have minded if the Gale who showed up for this story had been one of its casualties. It was pretty clear from the first chapter that Collins was directing us away from this relationship she had dangled in front of us. If this is the way the relationship had always been, as this book seems to imply, than this is the relationship that should have been there in Catching Fire.

For the first time in the trilogy, Peeta was not a Gary Stu, a doormat, a little too sacrificial for me to believe. He bite back. Unlike during the games, I never doubted that he could survive on his own. He stopped wanting to be a pointless martyr the death pleas were still there, but this time they made sense. Not that I ever wanted Peeta to be mean or broken, but he can have heart and a backbone too.

He could have a few flaws. Finally, I could root for him. My last reason is not that as Gale and Peeta changed, Katniss did too, and so did the world they lived in. In a harsh war world, you need someone strong and skilled by your side. In the other books, Katniss needed Gale. In a world where you have lost everything and no longer have a reason or the mental state or the will to fight, you need someone soft and caring. Even before Katniss said her bit about needing heart not fire, I knew she was going to say it.

And finally, the words were true. So yes, I am eating my words and saying Katniss ended up with the right person.

I just hate what Collins did to her to make her need it. I know Collins is capable of power. In the end, I was too numb to feel its power, to even cry, to feel anything at all.

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I left a fantastic series with a major blank. View all 94 comments. Feb 21, Kiki rated it it was ok Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Part 1 , was absolutely outstanding. I've seen both of the other movies for this series, and while I enjoyed them greatly, the third instalment was on another level entirely. It's one of the best movies I've seen in a very, very long time. Good job, movie people. You made a meh book into a stellar piece of cinema.

Probably the best ten pages of the series. The pages [ This just in: The pages before that, however, deserve nothing. The first pages can kiss my ass. This book was a fucking slog. I kid you not. This book tried me to the point of breaking. About halfway through, I was ready to feed the damn thing to my dog. I'm not the biggest Hunger Games fan. Y'all know that. Catching Fire was just fantastic. I really, really and truly enjoyed it. Mockingjay was a bloodbath.

If you're sensitive to pointless deaths and gratuitous violence, then this is not the book for you. Actually, I like that word. It describes this book perfectly. Everything in this book was gratuitous and over the top, from the wangst to the ridiculous romantic interludes in the middle of battle scenes, and from the candy-gore violence to the stupid, overly-disgusting deaths of several characters who did not need to die. There's also the writing, which is so overwrought - it's not even like the author took the sparseness of the first book and butchered it.

It's like she took the sparseness, fed it to her dog, fed the dog to a crocodile, fed the crocodile to a Tyrannosaurus rex, cut the Tyrannosaurus rex up into steaks, sold the steaks in Soho to a cabaret dancer, A-bombed the cabaret dancer's house, collected the ashes, mixed them into fluorescent paint, and then splattered the paint all over the White House in D. Because we, as readers who have stuck by and read the entire series through, need an entire page of Creative Writing Class explanation on what the Hanging Tree song means.

It's like in the first book, when we were constantly being told exactly what the dandelions represent. Everything, from Katniss's clothes which she's weirdly fixated with to her circular, drier-than-Egyptian-sand inner monologues were painstakingly pored over to the point of ridiculousness.

Shall I repeat that again? One more time?

Contrary to the masses, I love reading books where loads of lovable characters die in the final fight. I love going through that grief, feeling the torment of watching one of my beloved friends die a bloody death. In fact, in my own work, I have a death list. I literally have a list of the most beloved characters, and I've put stars in red pen against all those who die.

There are many red stars on that list. But what I do not enjoy, and what I found far too much of in Mockingjay , are pointless deaths. Deaths that don't ensure anyone else's survival, are excessively undignified, or never grieved for.

Finnick, Mesalla, Mitchell, Boggs, and Cinna all died ridiculous deaths that really did nothing to aid Katniss's bringing down the Capitol. Essentially, they were all just Mauve Shirts, and they had been all along. I mean, fine. If the author wanted to kill these characters, go ahead and do it. It's actually not the fact that the characters died that bothered me.

Katniss is somewhat content with her new life and her family, but still carries mental and emotional scars, and dreads the day her children learn about their parents' involvement in the war and the Games. When she feels distressed, Katniss plays a comforting, repetitive game: reminding herself of every good thing she has ever seen someone do.

The series ends with Katniss' somber reflection that "there are much worse games to play". Themes[ edit ] Reviews have noted many themes in the previous books that are also explored in "Mockingjay". A review from The Baltimore Sun noted that "the themes of the series, including physical hardships, loyalty in extreme circumstances and traversing morally ambiguous terrain, are continued at an even larger scale.

At the same time, while she was symbolically touching thousands of lives, she must also lead those people into war. Finally, Katniss realizes she cannot even trust President Coin , leader of District Even in a dystopian future, there's a better future.

The audiobook was released simultaneously on August 24, by Scholastic Audio. Following this, Scholastic printed an additional , copies, bringing the initial print run up to 1. Scholastic Trade president Ellie Berger said that sales "have exceeded all expectations". The official event in New York City was attended by Collins, and included many activities such as a tarot card reader, a magician, jugglers and face-painters. Prizes such as signed copies of Catching Fire and Hunger Games-themed cups were raffled.

Once Collins arrived, she read the first chapter of the novel, explaining that she would read with an accent since Katniss, the narrator, is from Appalachia. By midnight, copies were being sold with a signature stamp since Collins had a hand injury and was unable to sign. There were also advertisements for the book on websites such as Entertainment Weekly and Romantic Times.

National Entertainment Collectibles Association also sold other goods such as T-shirts, posters, games and bracelets.Retrieved December 30, Catching Fire was to be released on November 22, , [18] as a sequel to the film adaptation of The Hunger Games. Her fickleness is pretty inconsiderate to these two guys whom she supposedly cares about.

The post-traumatic stress, the mental breakdowns, the self-pity, the self-loathing, the nearing of insanity.. The Games begin, and nearly half the tributes are killed in the bloodbath at the start, fighting over the weapons and supplies throughout the arena. Suzanne Collins 's The Hunger Games. Retrieved September 2, Although it seems her death kind of defeated the point of sparing her from the Hunger Games. After a few days, an artificial fire drives Katniss toward the others.

MARYLIN from Sterling Heights
See my other articles. I enjoy episkyros. I do enjoy reading comics kindheartedly.
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